hispanic studies

Enforcing equality: court rulings, indigenous women, and political participation in Oaxaca, Mexico

Within the last decade, Mexico´s federal electoral courts have taken unprecedented steps to promote affirmative action in favor of women´s political participation. At the federal, state, and municipal levels, this has largely meant rulings that support legislation on gender-based quotas for public posts.  A stumbling block to this affirmative action initiative has been the predominately indigenous municipalities that hold local elections through tradition and custom instead of universal suffrage and secret ballot. Legally recognized as part of indigenous people´s collective right to self-determination, election through custom and tradition has been difficult to fit into existing juridical logics of gender equality.  In the past three years, however, a growing number of electoral conflicts appealed to the federal courts have brought the question of indigenous women´s political participation to the forefront. I examine several of these cases to explore how the courts mediate between the question of collective self-determination and individual women´s rights, how they seek to promote a liberal notion of gender equality, and how women and communities are responding to their rulings in unexpected ways.  I argue that what is at stake is more than just women´s political participation; rather, these rulings reflect contemporary contestations over gender, indigeneity, modernity, and democracy in Mexico more broadly.  
Holly Worthen is a Professor at the Instituto de Investigaciones Sociológicas at the Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Oaxaca in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico.  She received her Phd in Geography from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her work focuses on gender, migration, development and indigenous politics.
 
Date: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
231 White Hall Classroom Building
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Miguel Alvear Presents: Beyond the Mall: A Documentary About Popular Video Films in Ecuador

Miguel Alvear Presents: 
Beyond the Mall: A Documentary About Popular Video Films in Ecuador

Miguel Alvear is an Ecuadorian filmmaker. His recent movies are Más allá del Mall (2010) and Blak Mama (2009). He studied in Belgium and at the SFAI (California). His movies have been recognized with the Award DocTV in 2010, the prize for best Ecuadorian movie in 2008, and in the “Festival der Nationen”, Austria, 1996.

Sept 24th 4-6:30 pm 
White Hall Classroom Building 234

Sponsored by the International Studies Program, Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies at the University of Kentucky,Sociology Department University of Kentucky, University of Kentucky Department of Hispanic Studies

 

Date: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 4:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
White Hall Classroom 234

Cinema, Slavery, and Brazilian Nationalism

By studying Brazilian films released between 1976 and 2005, Gordon examines how the films both define the national community and influence viewer understandings of "Brazilianness." Though the films he examines span decades, they all communicate their revised version of Brazilian national identity through a cinematic strategy with a dual aim: to upset ingrained ways of thinking about Brazil and to persuade those who watch the films to accept a new way of understanding their national community. 

Date: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery

What’s Next: Fusing Interests in Undergraduate Research

Computer science and the St. Chad Gospels. Physics and Spanish. Math and international studies. The combination of these don't seem to make a lot of sense, but it is these interests that have shaped the undergraduate career of one UK senior.

Five A&S Students Named Fulbright Recipients

The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that five A&S students have been selected as recipients of Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarships.

Transnational Lives with William Nericcio

In the final part of this series, this Transnational Lives podcast focuses on social theory and the intersection of Spanish and American culture. In this podcast, Cate Gooch, a graduate student from the Department of English, Josh Martin, a graduate student from Hispanic Studies, and Yorki Encalada, a graduate student from Hispanic Studies, speak with William Nericcio about Mexican transnationalism and the development of his studies with “Mextasy,” his fight against stereotypes.
 
For more information about the lecture series that inspired this podcast series, please head to: Transnational Lives Lecture Series
 
This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.  
 

Creative Commons License
Transnational Lives with William Nericcio by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Transnational Lives with Nina Glick-Schiller

Connecting with people from around the world is much easier now than it has ever been before. With the internet, phones, and fast travel, we can build relationships and networks in new ways - breaking through the barriers of national boundaries. This development of relationships and their influence despite national borders is known as transnationalism, a social phenomenon that we will be focusing on throughout a four part series. Join the conversation as we kick off the series with Lauren Copeland, a graduate student from the Department of Gender & Women’s Studies, Pathmanesan Sanmugeswaran, a graduate student in Anthropology, and Agata Grzelczak, a graduate student in Hispanic Studies, as they interview Nina Glick-Schiller, one of the pioneers of transnational studies. Glick-Schiller’s research has spanned across her career, influencing scholars both in the humanities and social studies. 

For more information about the lecture series that inspired this podcast series, please head to: Transnational Lives Lecture Series

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard

Creative Commons License
Transnational Lives with Nina Glick-Schiller by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Myrup Book Focuses on Portuguese Empire

In a masterful reconceptualization of the functioning of empire, Erik Lars Myrup’s “Power and Corruption in the Early Modern Portuguese World,” to be published in July 2015 by Louisiana State University Press

College of Arts and Sciences Recognizes Its Award-winning Faculty

The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences will honor its faculty at 4 p.m. today at the William T. Young Library Auditorium.

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