News

8/17/2018

By Olivia Ramirez

Tsage Douglas standing in front of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

The connection between public health and economics might not be obvious to some, but the two fields have a unique and surprising interplay. Economics and public health both impact the well-being of the community. That is one of the reasons Tsage Douglas chose to earn a degree in public health from the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and a degree in foreign language and international economics in the UK College of Arts and Sciences.

Since taking Advanced Placement Micro and Macro Economics at Scott County High School, Douglas has been interested in the Federal Reserve. It was at this time that her interests in

8/13/2018

By Dave Melanson

Dave Eaton (right) a research scientist at UK's Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), mentors Todd Prater, an elementary school student from Floyd County, Kentucky.

At a quick glance, one might not think Dave Eaton and Todd Prater would have a whole lot in common.

Eaton, an Owensboro, Kentucky, native who earned his doctoral degree in chemistry from the University of Kentucky Department of Chemistry, is the consummate, professional researcher. Carbon is his game, and the UK Center for Applied Energy Research’s (CAER)laboratories is his home away from home. Whether he is working on carbon fiber, carbon nanotubes, activated carbon or energy storage applications, Eaton is constantly pushing the boundaries of discovery.

8/10/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

It's the diagnosis those 65 and older often fear, but what are the chances you will be unhappy if you develop some cognitive impairment in the years ahead?

A new study, authored by Anthony Bardo and Scott Lynch, tackles that very question by examining "cognitive life expectancy." What exactly does that term mean? Bardo, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Kentucky, describes "cognitive life expectancy" as how long older adults live with good versus declining brain health.

"There is a great deal of stigma and fear surrounding declining cognitive ability that sometimes comes with age — especially among those nearing the second half of their adult lives. Yet, findings from my recent study show that cognitive impairment does not equate to unhappiness."

How did Bardo

8/8/2018

By Whitney Hale

The National Archives and UK's Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center will present this year’s Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education Awards to three Kentucky educators: Laura J. Cooley, Dustin Ferrell and Amber Sergent.

The National Archives and the University of Kentucky Libraries Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center will present this year’s Earle C. Clements Innovation in Education Awards to three Kentucky educators: Laura J. Cooley, of Pikeville High School; Dustin Ferrell, of Eastern High School; and Amber Sergent, of Woodford County High School. The awards, which recognize the state’s best educators in history and/or civics, will be presented by 

8/7/2018

By Trey Melcher and Jenny Wells

Na'imah Muhammad and Nedjma Kalliney discuss their writings in a session of the "Giggles, Guts, and Glitter" creativity workshop. Photo courtesy of Anna K. Stone.

DaMaris B. Hill, an assistant professor of creative writing and English literature in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, recently hosted a writing and creativity workshop for young women of color. The workshop was made possible by a "Girls of Color: Voice and Vision" grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women.

The purpose of the project was to elevate the voices and lived experiences of these young women by sharing personal stories and creating art.

"A project that educates black girls about accessing voice,

7/30/2018

By Julie Wrinn

Chris Green (’93 B.A.) majored in English for the usual reason: he loved to read. His path to that degree, however, and to his success as a partner in the internationally prominent New York law firm Boies Schiller Flexner, was unusually long and circuitous.

“I was really introduced to serious writing by Bill Floyd, one of my all-time favorite teachers. He taught us Yeats in the eighth grade,” recalls Green. “Since then, I’ve loved poetry, especially the modern poets.” The doors Floyd opened proved to be the high point of Green’s early academic career, however, because he “back-slid” in high school.

Thanks to his SAT scores, Green was admitted to Princeton, but he lasted only three semesters. “It was an intensely challenging academic environment, and my study skills weren’t on par with my classmates.” He worked hard but couldn’t manage his

7/30/2018

By Whitney Hale and Jenny Wells

 

More than 45 of the University of Kentucky's students and recent graduates had the world's most prestigious scholarship, fellowship and internship organizations take note this year. The newest class of highly regarded scholars include UK’s 14th Truman Scholar and first Pickering Fellow.

Helping prepare these UK students and recent alumni to compete for and win such honors is the mission of the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards. Under the guidance and leadership of Pat Whitlow, the office identifies and works with young scholars on the application process for large scholastic prizes awarded by regional, national and international sources.

This year UK students and alumni were recognized with the following awards:

7/27/2018

By Trey Melcher

Kentucky Women Writers Conference has added fiction authors, Emily Fridlund and Sherry Thomas, to an all-star cast of writing talent presenting at the 2018 conference this September.

The Kentucky Women Writers Conference has added two award-winning fiction authors, Emily Fridlund and Sherry Thomas, to an all-star cast of writing talent presenting at the 2018 conference. The conference will run Sept. 13-16, in Lexington.

Emily Fridlund’s debut novel, "History of Wolves," caught critics’ attention. She was a finalist for the 2017 Man Booker Prize, won the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the

7/27/2018

By Trey Melcher

Jazmin Brown-Ianuzzi, assistant professor of psychology, is one of five young scholars selected for the inaugural Course Hero Woodrow Wilson Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

Jazmin Brown-Iannuzzi, assistant professor of psychology in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, is one of five young scholars selected for the inaugural Course Hero Woodrow Wilson Fellowship for Excellence in Teaching.

The fellowship supports rising stars who love teaching, demonstrate excellence as educators and are shaping their fields with exceptional research. The fellowship is a "genius grant" that emphasizes the balance between scholarly excellence and an approach to teaching that creates a new level of engagement for students in and

7/26/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

Kyle Longley, a graduate of the University of Kentucky, has been named director of the LBJ Presidential Library by the archivist of the United States. A distinguished historian, Longley will be the fifth director of the library, named for Lyndon B. Johnson, which opened to the public in 1971.

"Longley's extensive historical knowledge, combined with his teaching, research and leadership experience, will be of great value to the National Archives, the Johnson Library and its constituents," David S. Ferriero, archivist of the United States, said. "We welcome him and look forward to working with him on future projects and programs."

In 1993, Longley graduated from UK with a doctoral degree in history from the College of Arts and

7/25/2018

By Olivia Ramirez

Nancy Schoenberg and Carrie Oser

At the University for Kentucky, understanding and addressing the health needs of the people of the Commonwealth is the goal of many faculty, staff, clinicians and researchers. As a step toward improving health equity, the University of Kentucky Center for Health Equity Transformation (CHET) was established and recently approved by the UK Board of Trustees. 

Kentucky has the highest national rates of cancer incidence and mortality as well as high rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, substance abuse and other diseases. These burdensome health conditions disproportionately impact rural, racial/ethnic minorities, sexual minorities and those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Health equity research examines health and healthcare for underserved populations and looks at the

7/18/2018

By Lindsey Piercy and Whitney Hale

One of Lexington's benches portrays Crystal Wilkinson's 2016 book, "The Birds of Opulence," published by University Press of Kentucky. The bench can be seen outside Wilkinson's Wild Fig. Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.

Looking for a great place to dive into a summer book? Well, you’re in luck. Kentucky's literary heritage is being featured around Lexington as part of the new Book Benches public art exhibit to encourage reading.

The 36 fiberglass benches, which depict colorful artistic renderings of books by Kentucky authors, were unveiled in Gratz Park before being stationed in spaces around the city last month. The project, a collaboration between Arts Connect

7/6/2018

By Trey Melcher

Virginia Carter, who led the Kentucky Humanities Council for more than two decades, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humanities from the University of Kentucky at its December Commencement ceremonies. The UK Board of Trustees approved the recommendation of Carter at its last meeting. UK's honorary degrees pay tribute to those whose life and work exemplify professional, intellectual, or artistic achievement and have made significant contributions to society, the state and the University of Kentucky.

Growing up in Lexington, Carter developed a deep appreciation for nature, the great outdoors and adventure at an early age. After earning a fine arts bachelor's degree from Louisiana State University and an art history master's from UK, Carter taught at the University of Northern Iowa. Later, she returned to UK to earn a master's and doctorate in

7/5/2018

By Lindsey Piercy

Students at the University of Kentucky can obtain a Master of Science (MS) in digital mapping. The 30-credit online degree is designed for those seeking advanced technical and theoretical training in mapping.

The master's degree is being offered by the Department of Geography in the College of Arts and Sciences. The program is part of continued efforts to expand curriculum in geographic information systems (GIS) and digital mapping.

"We offer, what we believe to be, the only online MSc that focuses on the standards and practices of professionals in web mapping development," Matthew Wilson, associate professor of geography, said. "We believe our students will be prepared to enter a work environment that requires more out-of-the-box thinking

6/29/2018

By Amy Jones-TimoneyKody KiserJenny Wells-Hosley, and Brad Nally

 

With 27 majors and 36 minors, the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences is UK's largest college and touches almost every UK student by providing foundations for advanced study in every field.

Mark Kornbluh, who has served as dean of the college since 2009, talked with UKNow recently — during a walk through UK's main campus — about a few of the things that make his college so special: a diverse student body, outstanding faculty, interdisciplinary partnerships across campus and state-of-the-art facilities, like the new Don and Cathy Jacobs Science

6/26/2018

By Mack McCormick and Whitney Hale

Bobbie Ann Mason. Photo by Guy Mendes.

Life is a quilt — random bits of memory that somehow fit together, forming a cohesive yet unlikely pattern. One of the best ways to uncover these seemingly hidden patterns, as demonstrated by Kentucky writer and University of Kentucky alumna Bobbie Ann Mason, is through fiction.

“Writing fiction is a way of making patterns, discovering them hiding in the words and sensations of the story,” said Mason, who has been publishing fiction since her first story, “Shiloh,” in 1980. Mason’s stories explore a diverse set of themes ranging from war to love to family history, all the while trying to discover patterns in the random bits of

6/15/2018

By Whitney Hale

The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that modern and classical languages/Russian studiesand political science freshman Anna Wagner has been awarded a Critical Language Scholarship to study Russian. The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS), a program of the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, offers intensive summer language institutes overseas in 14 critical need foreign languages.

The CLS Program is part of a U.S. government effort to expand the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages. Participants are expected to

6/13/2018

Luke Bradley and Janice Fernheimer received the University of Kentucky 2018 Excellent Undergraduate Research Mentor Award. This student-nominated award recognizes UK faculty members who demonstrate an outstanding commitment to mentoring undergraduate researchers, providing exceptional undergraduate research experiences, as well as supporting and promoting the undergraduate research initiatives on campus.

Eighteen faculty mentors were nominated for the award by their students.

Bradley is an associate professor and research mentor in the Department of Neuroscience and the Department of Molecular and

6/12/2018

By Whitney Hale

The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that doctoral students Calah Ford and Lydia Hager and 2018 graduate Aaron Mueller have been selected to receive government-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. In addition, six other UK students received honorable mention recognition from the NSF. 

NSF Fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance for tuition and fees for a research-based master's or doctoral degree in a STEM (science, technology, engineering or mathematics) field. For the 2018 competition, NSF received over 12,000 applications and made 2,000 award offers.

6/8/2018

By Trey Melcher

 

LEXengaged, in partnership with William Wells Brown Elementary's 21st Century Program, and African Cemetery No. 2 created The Jockey Silks Art Project.

LEXengaged, along with William Wells Brown Elementary's 21st Century Program and African Cemetery No. 2, partnered to create the Jockey Silks Art Project.

The one-of-a-kind project features students' creative representations of the racing silks worn by the African-American jockeys who won 16 Kentucky Derby races held from 1875 to 1902. Nine of the jockeys depicted were born in Kentucky. They include: Oliver Lewis, William Walker, James Carter, Garret Lewis, Babe Hurd, Isaac Murphy, Erskine Henderson, Isaac Lewis, Alonzo Clayton, James

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