community

Passport to the World: Celebrating Community with Cecilia Amador

The College of Arts and Sciences' Passport to the World program has taken students all over the world. This year it’s stopping by our neighbor to the south: Mexico.
 
One of the ambassadors of the program is English major and A&S Spanish Social Media Coordinator Cecilia Amador. We sat down with Amador to discuss events that the program has been hosting around campus and the broader Lexington community celebrating different facets of Mexican culture and identity. 
 
If you would like more information about the Passport to the World program or to see photos from previous events, please visit mexico.as.uky.edu.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Seed Grants Build Relationships for Community-Engaged Research in Appalachia

The Center for Clinical and Translational Science is achieving its commitment to community-engaged research through a community mini-grant program for health outreach programs in Appalachia.

UK Community Encouraged to Get Involved at NCUR 2014

The National Conference on Undergraduate Research will bring nearly 4,000 additional students from across the country to the UK campus where they will present their research and creative endeavors while meeting other like-minded students.

Civil Rights Heroes Brought to Life at CORE Conference

Members of the public and especially young people are encouraged to attend "Aiming for New Heights," a celebration of the Lexington Congress on Racial Equality (CORE), the group of black and white individuals largely responsible for Kentucky’s civil rights movement.

Experience Appalachian Culture on Nov. 2

Kentuckians will have a chance to experience through music, crafts and cuisine the Appalachian culture that makes the region unique. The Pickin’ Time Mountain Music and Harvest Festival will offer all of those things Nov. 2 at the Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability in Jackson.

CESL Helps Bring Ecuador to the 2013 Latino Festival de Lexington

Thanks to the efforts of the participants in the Go Teacher program through the Center for English as a Second Language, September 21, 2013 was an historic day for Ecuador. Thirty-eight dancers joined the activities of the Latino Festival de Lexington to share their culture and bring a small piece of Ecuador to Lexington.

National Chemistry Week Celebration is a Don’t-miss Event

Chemistry department students, staff and faculty will host an interactive and exciting demonstration show titled "Energy Now and Forever!"

Bluegrass Mud Run to Benefit WUKY and UK Army ROTC; Registration Discount for UK Students, Employees

by Gail Bennett

 WUKY, the University of Kentucky's NPR station, is partnering with UK Army ROTC to present the Jack Kain Ford Bluegrass Mud Run.  This fun and exciting event will take place on the campus of the University of Kentucky Sept. 21, 2013.  This will be a 5K run starting at Commonwealth Stadium and proceeding through obstacles designed by UK Army ROTC.  These obstacles will be challenging yet fun and definitely get participants MUDDY! 

Modern Genesis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins

Worsham Theater on the UK Campus Map

Presented by the Department of Physics & Astronomy, professor Sandra Faber of the University of California will speak on "Modern Gensis: The Amazing Story of our Cosmic Origins". Less than one hundred years ago, astronomers did not know about galaxies or that the Milky Way is a galaxy in a vast, frothy sea of galaxies. Today, astronomers have made remarkable progress in understanding how galaxies form in our expanding universe and the crucial role that they play in how the elements we are made of were built, and even how our planets and our solar system came to be.  This lecture will distill a century of dramatic cosmic discoveries to present a comprehensive yet digestible account of why we are here and where we are going...cosmically speaking.

Sandra Faber is a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the Interim Director of the UCO/Lick Observatory.  She is an observational astronomer with primary research interests in cosmology and galaxy formation. Some of her major discoveries include the first structural scaling law for galaxies (called the Faber-Jackson relation), the discovery of large-scale flow perturbations in the expansion of the universe, and the ubiquity of massive black holes at the centers of galaxies.  In 1984, she and three colleagues presented the first detailed treatment of galaxy formation based on “cold dark matter,” which has since become the standard paradigm for galaxy formation in the universe.  Faber was one of three astronomers who diagnosed the optical flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope, and she played a major role in its repair.  From 1994-2005 she was Principal Investigator of the DEIMOS spectrograph, a large optical multi-object spectrograph for the Keck telescope that is the most powerful instrument of its kind in the world.  She and colleagues used DEIMOS to conduct the DEEP redshift survey of the distant universe, which collected spectra of 50,000 distant galaxies and exploited the immense power of Keck to see and study galaxy formation 10 billion years back in time.  She now leads the CANDELS project, the largest project in the history of the Hubble Space Telescope, to extend our view of galaxy formation back nearly to the Big Bang.  In 2009, she was awarded the Bower Award for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, and in 2012 she received the Bruce Medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and the Russell Prize of the American Astronomical Society, both for lifetime scientific achievement. Most recently, she received the National Medal of Science from President Obama in February 2013.

 

Date: 
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Worsham Theater, UK Student Center

Poetry to Heal PTSD: Travis Martin

We often hear about veterans that can't shake traumatic experiences and memories of war, but what about those who find ways to cope? Travis Martin, a PhD candidate in English, is doing research to document the ways in which veterans use the arts to process and move past trauma. He is the President of Military Experience and the Arts, a project that connects veterans with resources and outlets for their artwork, poetry, fiction, and scholarship, as well as the Veterans' PTSD Project, which seeks to dispel stereotypes about post-traumatic stress disorder by giving veterans a voice.

In this podcast, he reads and discusses three of his poems, “A Little Boy With Bananas,” “The Writing on the Wall,” and “Rifling About,” all of which reflect on his combat experiences in Iraq and life after returning home. The first two were featured in the New York Times, and the third can be downloaded here

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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