biology

A&S Hall of Fame 2014 - Dr. George H. Scherr

George H. Scherr is a bacteriologist, researcher and inventor, currently residing in Highland Park, Ill. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Queen’s College in 1941 – majoring in Biology with a minor in Chemistry – and studied chemistry at Princeton University before pursuing graduate study at the University of Kentucky. Scherr graduated from UK with a master’s degree in 1949 and a doctorate in 1951 in microbiology, focusing on bacteriology and cytogenetics.

Before receiving his graduate degrees, Scherr worked as a bacteriologist and researcher for the New York City Department of Health, the U.S. Civil Service Commission and the Biological Warfare Service. Following the completion of his doctorate, he served as an assistant professor of microbiology at the Creighton University School of Medicine and as an associate professor of bacteriology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

Much of Scherr’s research has been dedicated to developing methods for stopping life-threatening infections.Through experiments with silver nitrate and sodium alginate, Scherr was able to create the royal silver alginate bandage, a wound dressing that keeps lesions sterile and prevents bacteria from multiplying. He gave the rights to his discovery to three companies – one in the US, one in Ireland and one in India – allowing this important infection-fighting tool to reach virtually all corners of the globe.

 

 

Stanford Biologist to Speak on 'Stem Cell Fate and Function'

Helen Blau, director of Stanford University's Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology, will deliver the sixth annual Thomas Hunt Morgan Lecture, presented by the University of Kentucky Department of Biology.
Tags:

Four UK Biologists Form Regeneration "Cluster"

How are some animals able to regrow body parts following injury? Why can't humans do the same thing? Four professors in the University of Kentucky in the Department of Biology—Ann Morris, Randal Voss, Jeramiah Smith, and Ashley Seifert—are undertaking the basic scientific research needed to begin to answer these questions. Each scientist approaches the problem from a different angle, focusing on different aspects of regeneration, and using different vertebrate models. Together, they make up the core of an unofficial regeneration "cluster" within the department.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Add It Up: A Q&A with Chemistry's Mark Meier

The new College of Arts & Sciences Research Computing cluster shares the basic design elements of a modern supercomputer, though at a smaller scale and lower cost. Multiple systems are linked together within a high bandwidth, low latency framework, allowing researchers to run demanding applications across hundreds of processors simultaneously.

Chellgren Center Honors 43 New Fellows

Research Computing Cluster: Vincent Cassone

Innovative ways of teaching have already transformed UK's Biology department, but new facilities are on the horizon. Vincent Cassone, the Chair of the Biology Department at UK, discusses the A&S research computing cluster and the powerful new resources and collaborations across campus.

This interview was conducted by Scott Bradley and produced by David Cole.

 

Creative Commons License
A New Home for Biological Sciences: Vincent Cassone by University of Kentucky College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Regeneration Bonus: Randal Voss

 

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Randal Voss and axolotls.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-randal-voss

Regeneration Bonus: Jeramiah Smith

 

 

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Jeramiah Smith, salamanders and sea lampreys.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Read the full story here: uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-jeramiah-smith

 

 

Regeneration Bonus: Jeramiah Smith

Biologist Jeramiah Smith studies salamanders and sea lamprey to find genetic clues to regeneration.

Regeneration Bonus: Ann Morris

University of Kentucky biologist Ann Morris is studying retinal regeneration in zebrafish to find ways to combat human eye diseases.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - biology
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading