News

4/21/2017

By Megan Foltz

 

University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Creative Writing and African American and Africana Studies DaMaris B. Hill will participate in the European Association for American Studies (EAAS) meeting next September at the University of Eastern Finland in Joensuu, Finland. EAAS meets once a year to study a marginalized text or author.

This year’s workshop will focus on America’s early 20th century magazine The Brownies’ Book, published by NAACP founder William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, better known as W.E.B. Du Bois. With most of the children’s literature of the day produced by white authors for white children, Du Bois wanted to offer an alternative. The magazine contextualizes writing of the 19th century and counters negative stereotypes about African Americans in the early 20th century. The Brownies’ Book contains stories and poems by writers

4/20/2017

SURCO is a non-profit grassroots organization combining consulting, academic programs and local activism. Classes and discussion within SURCO focus on political ecology, political economy, land tenure, indigenous struggles, militarism, environmental challenges, and much more. Each field trip compliments a topic or topics discussed in lectures. 

Students from all universities are encouraged to apply. Apply early to take advantage of your university's scholarship opportunities. The 2017 UK Program in Oaxaca

 

4/20/2017

By Whitney Hale

Beau Revlett, a sophomore majoring in philosophy at the University of Kentucky, has received the John Lewis Fellowship from Humanity In Action (HIA). The fellowship recognizes commitment to social justice and future promise for community leadership. 

The HIA Fellowship brings together international groups of college students and recent graduates to explore national histories of discrimination and resistance — including the political foundations of racial hierarchies, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and colonial domination — as they affect different minority groups today. The fellowship seeks to educate, connect and inspire the world's future leaders in the fields of human rights and social justice.

As a recipient of the HIA John Lewis Fellowship

4/19/2017

By Carl Nathe

D. Stephen Voss is the 2017 recipient of the William E. Lyons Award, co-sponsored by the University of Kentucky’s Martin School of Public Policy and Administration and the Department of Political Science, part of the College of Arts and Sciences. The annual honor is given to one person in recognition of a long record of outstanding service to UK, the community and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

The award is named for the late "Bill" Lyons, a professor of political science and public administration, who during his much-admired tenure at UK served as director of the Martin School and chaired the political science department.

Voss is an is associate professor of political science at the

4/18/2017

Semple Day is our annual, Spring celebration of the Geography Department at the University of Kentucky. Come and reacquaint yourself with the Department and University, and enjoy the day’s highlights: an afternoon open colloquium by a distinguished visitor and an evening celebration at the Lyric Theater in downtown Lexington, only a few blocks from campus. The reception provides a chance to catch up with friends (and make new ones), a venue for a brief program of awards and recognitions, and a convenient departure point for post-Semple celebrations on your own in one of the many new restaurants and watering holes in Lexington’s burgeoning downtown food scene. The event will start at 2:00 PM Friday in the President's Room in the Singletary Center with an address by Professor John Paul Jones III and then move to the

4/17/2017

By Jenny Wells

Beth Guiton, professor of chemistry in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has been selected as a Scialog Fellow by the Research Corporation for Scientific Advancement.

As a fellow, Guiton will participate in Scialog: Advanced Energy Storage, a program involving early career rising stars, beyond postdoctoral appointment, interested in pursuing collaborative, high-risk, highly impactful discovery research on untested ideas applicable to creating breakthroughs in energy storage. The program has a format in which participants are encouraged to engage in dialogue and form new research teams, often multidisciplinary and composed of both theorists and experimentalists.

This Scialog initiative will center on two conferences to be held fall 2017

4/17/2017

By Gail Hairston

The last event of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences’ Civil Life Panel Series’ spring season is slated noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, with two follow-up panel discussions later the same day. The topic is “Science Speaks.”

Allan Butterfield, Alumni Association Endowed Professor of Biological Chemistry; Andrea Erhardt, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences; Bruce Webb, professor of entomology; and David Weisrock, associate professor of biology, will gather for a lively discussion at noon in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

They will discuss what it means

4/15/2017
Examples of atmospheric particles. Left: clouds over Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii. Right: fog over Cincinnati, Ohio. Credit: Alexis Eugene

Atmospheric aerosols such as smoke, fog, and mist are made of fine solid or liquid particles suspended in air. In the lower atmosphere aerosols play a major role in controlling air quality, as well as in scattering and absorbing sunlight. This interaction of aerosols with light varies widely and depends on their complex chemical composition that rapidly changes under the governing highly reactive conditions found in the atmosphere. Importantly, the mysterious formation of carbon-containing atmospheric particles has intrigued atmospheric scientists during the last decade. This issue demands a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of atmospheric reactions as tackled in a new laboratory study entitled Reactivity of Ketyl and Acetyl Radicals from Direct Solar Actinic Photolysis of Aqueous Pyruvic Acid published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A.

Examples of
4/14/2017

By Gail Hairston

Molly T. Blasing, assistant professor of Russian studies in the University of Kentucky Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures, has been awarded a 2017 NEH (National Endowment for the Humanities) Summer Stipend, one of only two conferred this year in Kentucky.

She will use the funding to complete research on a final chapter of her book, “Snapshots of the Soul: Photo-Poetic Encounters in Modern Russian Culture.”

Blasing's project examines the relationship between photographic seeing and poetic creation in Russia and the Soviet Union. The book represents an interdisciplinary approach to modern literary studies, visual culture and the social history of technology.

Blasing’s study considers how photography

4/14/2017

By Jenny Wells

 

Lithospheric magnetic field. Video courtesy of European Space Agency (ESA)

A University of Kentucky geophysicist is helping an international team of scientists reveal dramatic new information about the Earth’s magnetic field.

Two years ago, Dhananjay Ravat, who is a professor in the UK Departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Physics and Astronomy, was asked by the leader of the Swarm Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility of the European Space Agency (ESA) to collaborate with their team to create a map of the magnetic features of the Earth’s lithosphere. Ravat, who has worked on geophysical data from several space missions around the Earth, Mars and the moon, was intrigued by the Swarm project, and his involvement

4/14/2017

By Whitney Hale and Gail Hairston

 

Watch as contestants at the Brooklyn Book Festival try to figure out what "The Animators," by UK alumna Kayla Rae Whitaker, is all about based only on its cover.

Very few authors find themselves publishing their debut novel with a name as big as Random House, much less earning acclaim from critics such as The New York Times. But for University of Kentucky alumna Kayla Rae Whitaker, these are natural next steps for someone who showed tremendous promise during her college career. Whitaker’s novel, "The Animators," was released earlier this year.

Aspiring writers from the university and across the nation will get to hear Whitaker's own take on her early success and hear a reading from "The

4/13/2017

By Gail Hairston

The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) recently named Brenna Reinhart Byrd Teacher of the Year. Byrd is a University of Kentucky assistant professor of German studies. As the southern regional representative chosen by SCOLT, she will compete for Teacher of the Year at the national level at the annual conference of the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages. 

Byrd was named Kentucky's Teacher of the Year by the Kentucky World Languages Association in September 2016.

Byrd has over 15 years of education and teaching experience in the German language. She received her bachelor’s degree in German and a minor in linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin and both her master’s and doctoral degrees in Germanic linguistics from University of California, Los Angeles, before

4/12/2017

By Gail Hairston

 

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced Friday that University of Kentucky’s Peter Joseph Kalliney and 172 other scholars, artists and scientists in the United States and Canada have received a coveted Guggenheim Fellowship.

According to the foundation’s announcement, successful candidates were appointed on the basis of “prior achievement and exceptional promise.”

“It’s exciting to name 173 new Guggenheim Fellows,” said the President of the Guggenheim Foundation Edward Hirsch in a media release. “These artists and writers, scholars and scientists, represent the best of the best. Each year since (its establishment in) 1925, the Guggenheim Foundation has bet

4/12/2017

By Tiffany Molina

Beymer-Farris and a friend tote firewood through the Tanzanian jungle.

“Nchi ya Amani” means the country of peace in Swahili and is used to refer to the African country of Tanzania, a highly biodiverse nation that houses one of the natural wonders of the world, the Ngorongoro Crater. It is no wonder that University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Geography Betsy Beymer-Farris fell in love with Tanzania when she first visited during her undergraduate career at Wittenberg University.

Before her first trip to Tanzania, Beymer-Farris, a first-generation scholar, had never traveled outside the U.S. “My first experience in Tanzania was 17 years ago. I did undergraduate research and lived in the country, and fell in love with it,” Beymer-Farris said.

“It’s incredibly beautiful, it has some of the

4/12/2017

By Kathy Johnson and Terry Sebastian

 

A University of Kentucky sociology class won the #VoiceofJustice video contest, as announced via Facebook Live yesterday by Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear and Eileen Recktenwald, director of the Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs (KASAP).

The competition called upon college students to submit 30-second videos to promote the free and confidential Sexual Assault Hotline, 800-656-HOPE, and to increase awareness of sexual assault and active bystanding to help prevent it.

A panel of survivors and victim advocates selected the video “Stand with us” as the overall $500 video prizewinner. Students enrolled in Emily Bonistall

4/10/2017

By Dominique Page

This week, the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW) will present the fourth lecture of their series "Researching Violence: Challenges, Strategies, and Practices."

Claire Renzetti, professor and chair of the UK Department of Sociology, and the Judy Conway Patton Endowed Chair for CRVAW, will deliver the lecture titled "Benefits and Challenges of Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk for Studying Violence Against Women" at noon, Wednesday, April 12, in Room 115 of the UK College of Nursing.

The endowed faculty at the center are presenting topics over the next several years regarding the challenges of measuring violence against women and potential strategies for conducting this research. The focus is on conceptual and

4/10/2017

By Gail Hairston

The fourth event for the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Civic Life seminar series will be moderated by Molly Thomasy Blasing, assistant professor of Russian studies in the college’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC). The event will be noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

This week’s topic is “Russia and the World in 2017."

A panel discussion will be moderated by Blasing with: Gregory Hall (Patterson School); Karen Petrone (History); Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby (MCLLC);

4/9/2017

A research study performed by Dr. Dmytro Havrylyuk, Dr. David Heidary, Leona Nease, Dr. Sean Parkin, and Dr. Edith Glazer was profiled on the back cover of the journal The European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry for a special cluster issue titled "Metal Anticancer Complexes – Activity, Mechanism of Action and Future Perspectives". 

From the description of the cover art: "This cover feature shows a selection of inorganic elements that are used in new anticancer agents described in this cluster issue. The hourglass symbolizes the time-sensitive nature of chemotherapy treatment as well as the spatial and temporal control achieved with light-activated compounds. The strained complex on the left can eject a ligand to form covalent adducts with DNA, while the unstrained complex on the right generates ROS. In both cases pyridylbenzazole ligands (X = CH, NH, O, S) were

4/7/2017
By Gail Hairston Throughout Andrew Byrd’s successful career in academia, he has pushed to understand ancient languages to a depth no one has before. His goal was to understand how languages spoken thousands of years ago actually sounded.   That scholarly obsession has led Byrd, an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Kentucky, to places and experiences he never imagined. He just completed creating ancient languages for National Geographic Channel’s new series “Origins: The Journey of Humankind.”   The global notoriety began in 2013 when Byrd’s work caught the attention of the Archaeological Institute of America’s Archaeology magazine. The magazine published an online piece that included recordings of Byrd reading two fables he had constructed in the prehistoric language known as Proto-Indo-European (PIE). It wasn’t long before he was featured in several
4/7/2017
By Whitney Harder   Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.   Kirk is editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel for the 2016-17 academic year and was chosen for her pursuit of open records from UK. In January, a judge ruled in favor of UK's position in the case involving the privacy of victim survivors of sexual misconduct. The Kernel is appealing.   Kirk, along with nine other winners, is profiled in the May issue of Glamour. The story is available online at www.glamour.com/story/2017-college-women-of-the-year-winners.     All winners receive a cash prize, a trip to New York City, introductions to top professionals in a variety of fields, national recognition in the magazine, and hair

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