News

12/1/2016

By Jenny Wells

Two faculty members from the University of Kentucky have received three of four funded awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop responses to the opioid injection epidemic that can be implemented by public health systems in rural communities.

Carrie Oser, an associate professor of sociology in the UK College of Arts & Sciences, was awarded a one-year, $150,000 grant for her project "Improving Outcomes after Prison for Appalachian PWIO (People who Inject Opioids): The Role of XR-NTX & Networks." This research aims to understand the factors and barriers related to an effective continuum of care for people who inject opioids, with a specific focus on social networks, as they leave prison and return to their normal lives. The ultimate goal of this

11/29/2016

One of the benefits of a large research university is the opportunity it provides undergraduates to study a wide variety of disciplines while working with nationally recognized scholars. In order to promote these types of educational experiences for students, the Office of Undergraduate Research offers Research and Creativity Grants during the summer term.

“Receiving this grant has changed my life in more ways than one,” said Michael Steenken, anthropology senior and 2016 Summer Research Grant recipient. “I have been given the opportunity to explore my curiosities and passions with the guided help of various professionals. I have had the ability to fall even more in love with the area of study that has always fascinated me. I have been able to gain a basic foundation in how to conduct academic research.”

Under faculty advisor David Pollack, Steenken’s research focused

11/28/2016

By Amanda Fuller

The Kentucky Academy of Science (KAS) held its 2016 Annual Meeting Nov. 4‐5, at the University of Louisville. More than 700 scientists and students attended the meeting, and hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students from Kentucky and regional colleges and universities participated in the research competitions.

Winners of the student competitions from the University of Kentucky included:

Eashwar Somasundaram, second place: Undergraduate Research Poster Presentation — Cellular and Molecular Biology; Eura Shin, first place: Undergraduate Research Poster Presentation — Computer and Information Sciences; Bailey Phan, ​first place: Undergraduate Research Oral Presentation — Computer and Information Sciences; LaShay Byrd, third place: Undergraduate Research Oral Presentation — Health Sciences; and
11/28/2016

By Kevin Kiernan

In the late summer of 2016, University of Kentucky archaeologist Richard Jefferies and his crew of graduate and undergraduate students returned to Sapelo Island to continue work on the Sapelo Island Mission Period Archaeological Project (or SIMPAP). Over the past 13 years, Jefferies and his colleague Christopher Moore, of the University of Indianapolis, have systematically investigated an expansive area north of the famous shell rings on Sapelo Island (Site 9Mc23). With a combination of extensive shovel probing, unit excavation, and geophysical prospection, the archaeologists have uncovered a wide range of mission-era evidence, including sherds of Spanish majolica pottery, pieces of olive jars, wrought-iron nails, glass beads, a small brass bell, an elegant cloth-covered button plausibly from a vestment, Altamaha sherds, and much evidence of Guale-Spanish
11/23/2016

By Mack McCormick and Whitney Hale

University Press of Kentucky (UPK) authors Gerald L. Smith, Karen Cotton McDaniel, and John A. Hardin have been named the recipients of a 2016 Kentucky History Award given by the Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) for their book, The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia.

The Kentucky History Awards recognize outstanding achievements by historians, public history professionals, volunteers, business and civic leaders, communities, and historical organizations throughout the Commonwealth. The awards were presented Nov. 11, at the KHS Annual Meeting and Kentucky History Celebration at the Old State

11/18/2016

By Jenny Wells

David Jensen, an assistant professor of mathematics in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, received funding this fall from the National Science Foundation for his research in algebraic geometry, a central topic in mathematics with applications to many other disciplines.

Jensen will use the three-year, $136,000 grant to study the geometric properties of curves that are described by polynomial equations. Many natural phenomena of interest in physics, biology and computer science can be modeled by polynomials, making algebraic geometry a useful tool for the scientific community at large. While some curves may have exotic or pathological properties, it is

11/17/2016

The Small-Molecule X-Ray Crystallography Facility in the Department of Chemistry has been awarded a prestigious and highly competitive grant from the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) program of the National Science Foundation (NSF).  The award of $383,133 (70% NSF, 30% UK matching funds) will fund the acquisition of a state-of-the-art microfocus X-ray diffractometer.

X-ray crystallography has long been considered the 'gold-standard' for providing detailed atomic-level structural information for molecules in chemical, pharmaceutical, and materials research. The award proposal by X-Ray Facility director Sean Parkin, Department of Chemistry professors Susan Odom, Phoebe Glazer, and John Anthony, and College of Pharmacy professor Oleg Tsodikov will modernize and dramatically enhance structural chemistry research instrumentation at UK.  The

11/17/2016

The Light Microscopy Core, a newly named research core facility under the auspices of the Office of the Vice President for Research, has invested $1.3 million in two new microscopes to support an array of research across the University of Kentucky. Dr. Chris Richards, director of the Light Microscopy Core and assistant professor of chemistry, said these instruments and the hiring of manager Thomas Wilkop will enable UK researchers to utilize the most advanced imaging available. “If we want to understand biological systems, ranging from neuroscience to physiology, or apply imaging techniques for cutting-edge materials science, we really need to have the type of equipment that makes us competitive with other universities. These

11/16/2016

By Whitney Hale

University of Kentucky senior Rachel Dixon, of Lexington, was recently named a finalist for the Rhodes Scholarship. Dixon, an English and writing, rhetoric and digital studies major, will interview for the prestigious scholarship that funds graduate study at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

Rhodes Scholars are chosen not only for their outstanding scholarly achievements, but for their character, commitment to others and to the common good, and for their potential for leadership in whatever domains their careers may lead.

A UK Honors College member and former ambassador, Dixon is a 

11/15/2016

By Whitney Hale

University of Kentucky Libraries will be hosting an online “Jeopardy” contest Nov. 14-18 as part of the campus activities being presented in celebration of International Education Week. The contest will focus on the College of Arts and Sciences Passport to the World countries celebrated as part of their Year of South Asia, and is designed to provide information about the countries as well as to raise awareness about library resources available that provide country information.  

The winning contestant of the UK Libraries "Jeopardy" contest will receive a $25 Starbucks gift card. The contest will be available online at: 

11/11/2016

By Gail Hairston

Emily Boulieu's honors class observed Fayette County polling locations as part of a national research project.

For most of the University of Kentucky students observing Lexington’s polling places on Election Day, it was their first experience engaged in the nation’s electoral process. They were taking part in a nationwide review of the voting process, led by Associate Professor of Comparative Politics Emily Beaulieu.

Some students came away with indelible memories.

Eric Bingham noted a young immigrant, obviously voting for her first time with her eyes brimming with tears and pride. “To see the joy she had and the pride she took in voting, made me very proud of my country,” he said.

Those standing in line, waiting, also caught Bingham’s

11/10/2016

By Samantha Ponder

Air Force ROTC cadets of the 290th Cadet Wing at the University of Kentucky will run from Lexington to Frankfort — 29 miles — this Saturday, Nov. 12, for the annual POW/MIA Run to honor the sacrifices of the nation's prisoners of war and those still missing in action.  

The group of runners also includes Air Force ROTC faculty and cadets of the University of Louisville and Team Red White and Blue. Runners will depart from Barker Hall on the UK campus at 6 a.m. and finish at the Kentucky Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Frankfort.  The route will take runners on Old Frankfort Pike, where community volunteer organizations, such as JROTC, Civil Air Patrol, Boy Scouts of America and more, will provide water stations along the way.   "The POW/MIA Run is not just a run to remember, it's a run so that we never forget the torture, the pain, the
11/7/2016

Throughout the Fall 2016 semester, A&S Dean Mark Kornbluh, Dr. Kathi Kern, and Dr. Ashley Sorrell have co-taught a UK Core course, UKC 180: America Through the Lens of the 2016 Election. One of the themes of the class has been the importance of voter participation. Working in caucuses of six, the students produced their own get-out-the-vote advertisements. The whole class voted on the top spots and those students have given us permission to share their work. 

This video was voted the top by the class.

 

The runner-up videos were also excellent: https://goo.gl/TB5FmO, https://goo.gl/xyAg09, https://youtu.be/sxhRr06E6QU, https://goo.gl/R0DHI3, and https://goo.gl/wcsiDc

11/7/2016

By Gail Hairston

One would have to be isolated to the point of sequestered to escape the tumultuous presidential campaign between Democratic candidate Hilary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump.   Tomorrow, finally, the nation chooses.   Before the results are recorded for posterity, three University of Kentucky political scientists and one historian agreed to comment upon the 2016 battle for the White House. Many Americans believe this campaign has been unlike any that has come before. Is this merely our limited perception of political history in America?   The experts agree. It is real.   As points of comparison, Associate Professor of Political Science Stephen Voss remembered the 1860 presidential election, which displayed “some of the same fictionalization” and the 1968 election “which had some
11/4/2016

By Caroline Kelsey

As part of the Year of South Asia, the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences will host guest speaker Anna Morcom, professor of ethnomusicology at Royal Holloway University of London, for a lecture related to her book, “Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance: Cultures of Exclusion,” which was awarded the 2014 Alan Merriam Prize. The free public talk will take place from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 7, in the Niles Gallery of Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.   “Illicit Worlds of Indian Dance: Cultures of Exclusion,” looks at the evolution of the arts in India from the 1930s when no woman
11/2/2016

Ellen Crocker (forestry), Susan Odom (chemistry), and Bradford Condon (plant pathology) received a grant from KY NSF EPSCoR for Education and Outreach Activities, which will fund an Expanding Your Horizons conference at the University of Kentucky. This STEM conference for middle school girls will feature interactive activities led by UK undergraduate and graduate students and will include college preparation sessions for accompanying parents. The conference will be held in the Jacobs Science Building on April 29, 2017. For more information, contact Dr. Crocker.

10/27/2016

By Jenny Wells, Rebecca Freeman

Alan Fryar, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES), received the 2016 International Association of Hydrogeologists, U.S. National Chapter International Service Award at the recent national meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado.   Fryar studies water quality, particularly water in the ground used for drinking water. Groundwater is the largest source of unfrozen fresh water on Earth, but access to sufficient amounts of clean water is a challenge in developing countries. The International Service Award honored Fryar's 15 years of working on this problem with students and scientists in Africa and Asia, including developing a program to train graduate students from these regions.   “Alan is not only an educator
10/26/2016

By Gail Hairston

University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Dean Mark Kornbluh recently announced that Associate Professor Mónica Díaz will serve as director of the International Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences, the largest interdisciplinary major in the college.  

“It is wonderful that Dr. Diaz has agreed to lead the International Studies Program. I know the International Studies majors will benefit greatly from her leadership and that faculty will enjoy working with her to strengthen International Studies at UK,” said Sue Roberts, associate provost for internationalization. “Dr. Diaz is an excellent choice for this important role. She is an interdisciplinary thinker, and a skilled leader who is sure to take International Studies in exciting new directions.” 

Díaz has a joint doctorate
10/24/2016

By Jenny Wells

    “If we're going to remedy a problem, we need to know all the different facets of it.”    That’s how Claire Renzetti, the Judi Conway Patton Endowed Chair in the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women, and professor and chair of UK Department of Sociology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, approaches her research.   “I've just always focused on people who are on the margins,” Renzetti said. “So I always felt like in order to fully understand a project, you need to study groups that are understudied, or that maybe don't have a common experience because one size doesn't fit all.”   Renzetti’s research focuses on violence against women, particularly violent victimization
10/24/2016

By Gail Hairston

As more and more lesbian and gay adults adopt children, controversies continue regarding comparative parenting skills and the impact on the children.   For nearly a decade, University of Kentucky Assistant Professor of Psychology Rachel H. Farr has studied different aspects of family life among heterosexual, gay and lesbian parents and their adopted children. Her newest findings were published by the Developmental Psychology journal last week online.   Farr’s most recent research results published in the journal Developmental Psychology provides further support that children adopted by lesbian and gay parents are well-adjusted, not only in early childhood, but across time into middle childhood. Her study focused on a longitudinal follow-up of nearly 100

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