News

5/9/2011

UK Paved the Way

https://www.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/original.mp3

Jeffery Burch is a graduate from the University of Kentucky. He currently serves as president of the Atlanta Alumni club in Georgia, volunteers as a student recruiter in the Atlanta area, and is an avid UK sports fan. His experiences at UK paved the way for the rest of his career.

 

5/8/2011

All students at the University of Kentucky have to take multiple classes in the College of Arts and Sciences to fulfill their general education requirements.

But in today’s increasingly specialized world, some people question the practicality and benefits of classes in the liberal arts: sure, studying English is quaint, but unnecessary; history is a good hobby, but nothing more; a foreign language is interesting, but that’s all.

They beg the question, who needs the liberal arts?

Ask UK A&S graduates, however, and they will readily tell you that their education in the liberal arts greatly rewarded them both professionally and personally.

Their answer: everyone needs the liberal arts.

“Arts and Sciences offers the courses that are foundational for any educated person,” said Anna Bosch, associate dean for undergraduate programs in the College. “We

5/5/2011
Richard Waterman, professor in the Department of Political Science, has penned a novel entitled "The Oracle: The Succession War." The novel is a science-fiction take on politics, ambition, and the complex relationships that arise in the context of shifts in political power. 

The novel was released in 2010 by Otherworld Publications, a publishing firm in Louisville, Kentucky. The cover and illustrations for "The Oracle: The Succession War" are by Sendil Nathan.

Waterman's blog about the book release can be found here.

Article Date: 5/5/2011
5/5/2011
Tonya and Jackie Jones

Tonya and Jackie Jones giggle like best friends over the remnants of a casual lunch. You almost feel like you're intruding in attempts to capture their attention. Mother and daughter never seem to tire of each other's company, especially considering they live together in the Jones family home in Lexington and both work part time at the Inn on Broadway downtown.

"We do everything together," Jackie Jones laughed. "And this is no different."

In this instance, Jackie is alluding to her impending May Commencement Ceremony, where she will graduate with a degree in history. Tonya Jones will have a front row seat for her daughter's graduation, as she is receiving a degree in history from UK as well.

"I refused to let her graduate before me," joked

5/4/2011
Natalie Glover

Graduate Student

By Megan Neff
Photos by Mark Cornelison

Natalie Glover bears no material resemblance to Wassily Kandinski.

But the 23-year-old psychology graduate student has dealt with the abstract in ways that parallel this Russian abstract painter and art theorist.

The most obvious parallel is that Glover is a painter too. And like Kandinski, she realizes the intrinsic value of art in dealing with matters of human nature; of reflecting not only what is aesthetically pleasing, but also what is internally revealing.

“The older I get, the more I study, the more confident I become,” said Glover. “And I find that in my art. More and more I’m starting to do original work, most of it abstract. I’m starting to trust in my abilities more.”

Though Glover’s path did not lead to pioneering a new school of art, it

5/4/2011

 

Victoria Camille (Millie) Westmont presented her research "Round, Ground, and Stone:  Identifying Morphological and Functional Variation with Fort Ancient Groundstone Discoids" at the prestigious 10th Anniversary Posters-at-the-Capitol in February, at the 28th Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference, Natural Bridge State Park in March, and has shown it at the Undergraduate Showcase of Scholars with mentors  A. Gwynn Henderson and David Pollack. . Westmont was also awarded a $2,000 University of Kentucky Undergraduate Summer Research and Creativity Grant for research this summer of 2011 for her
5/4/2011

A&S Ambassador - Cameron Hamilton

https://www.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/hamilton.mp3

Cameron Hamilton serves as a K Crew Coordinator for UK's K Week for incoming students, as well as serving as an A&S Ambassador. Hamilton discusses new initiatives that  the K Crew Coordinators are working on, as well as the personal and professional benefits of being a K Crew Coordinator and A&S Ambassador.

5/3/2011

"Back home … there's nothing like it."

To say that University of Kentucky biology graduate Kellie Farthing loves Eastern Kentucky is an understatement.

Farthing is as proud of her accent as she is her hometown. She's proud of her sister, who graduated from the University of Kentucky last year with a 4.0 GPA in psychology. There's also her mom and three other siblings and the nieces and nephews, many who have remained in Martin, Ky.

"Martin probably has a couple thousand people. I graduated high school with a class of 83, to put it in perspective," Farthing said. "I say that I'm halfway between Pikeville and Hazard… people usually know one place or the other."

Farthing will gladly be moving back in with her mom after graduation, having accepted a two-year contract with Teach for America in its inaugural

5/2/2011

Rebecca Street Undergraduate Student by Amber Scott photos by Mark Cornelison

Rebecca Street grew up in Clemson, S.C., a town known for being the home of Clemson University, for historic houses and for thick Southern drawls. Also for neighboring Greenville, S.C., home to BMW's North American Headquarters, and it is this latter fact, oddly enough, that set Street on the path to studying linguistics at the University of Kentucky. "In high school, I did an exchange program in Germany that was sponsored by BMW since my high school had one of the best German language programs in the state," she said. "It was my first time being abroad, and it really got me interested in what life is like in other places. That was my inspiration for deciding that languages and other cultures were what I was interested in." Drawing on that newfound interest and an off-the-cuff suggestion from

5/2/2011
At the 2011 annual meeting for the Society for Applied Anthrpology in Seattle, UK Anthrpology professors Diane King and Hsain Ilahiane, and graduate student Karen Rignall discussed "Anthropological Insights into the 2011 Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East."

To listen to their comments via podcast, click here. Article Date: 5/2/2011
5/2/2011
At the 2011 annual meeting for the Society for Applied Anthrpology in Seattle, UK Anthrpology professors Diane King and Hsain Ilahiane, and graduate student Karen Rignall discussed "Anthropological Insights into the 2011 Uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East."

To listen to their comments via podcast, click here. Article Date: 5/2/2011
5/2/2011
Hsain Ilahiane, associate professor of Anthropology, has released a briefing about the ongoing fight for democracy in North Africa and the Middle East. Ilahiane's document was presented to the Society for Applied Anthropology's Human Rights and Social Justice Committee. The full report is available in .pdf format at the Society for Applied Anthropology's website.

Ilahiane has carried out research in Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa, and his areas of theoretical interest are globalization, development and information and communication technologies, and political ecology. 

UK Anthropology professors Diane King and Hsain Ilahiane's comments on the
5/2/2011
Hsain Ilahiane, associate professor of Anthropology, has released a briefing about the ongoing fight for democracy in North Africa and the Middle East. Ilahiane's document was presented to the Society for Applied Anthropology's Human Rights and Social Justice Committee. The full report is available in .pdf format at the Society for Applied Anthropology's website.

Ilahiane has carried out research in Northern and Sub-Saharan Africa, and his areas of theoretical interest are globalization, development and information and communication technologies, and political ecology. 

UK Anthropology professors Diane King and Hsain Ilahiane's comments on the uprisings
5/2/2011

When the University of Kentucky established the Committee on Social Theory in 1989, it was one of the first of its kind.

The committee, in the College of Arts and Sciences, provides one of the most engaging teaching, research and learning experiences at UK, including 75 affiliated faculty from 17 departments and schools across campus. 

 "The program is premised on the belief that major social questions and problems, issues of our time and of earlier periods, that touch all of us, can be investigated constructively across disciplinary and theoretical divides, between scholars and intellectuals, particularly of the humanities and the social sciences, as well as, we believe, the physical and life sciences,” said Social Theory Director and French Professor

5/2/2011

When the University of Kentucky established the Committee on Social Theory in 1989, it was one of the first of its kind.

The committee, in the College of Arts and Sciences, provides one of the most engaging teaching, research and learning experiences at UK, including 75 affiliated faculty from 17 departments and schools across campus. 

 "The program is premised on the belief that major social questions and problems, issues of our time and of earlier periods, that touch all of us, can be investigated constructively across disciplinary and theoretical divides, between scholars and intellectuals, particularly of the humanities and the social sciences, as well as, we believe, the physical and life sciences,” said Social Theory Director and French Professor

5/2/2011

There’s more than 4,300 miles separating Morehead, KY and Berlin, Germany. For Ben Williams, it was a gap that would be bridged thanks, in part, to his experiences at the University of Kentucky.
Hailing from Morehead, Williams graduated from Rowan County Senior High. From there, he went to the University of Kentucky, followed by a graduate degree from the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. His parents still live in Morehead, where his mother works in the Fuzzy Duck Coffee Shop and his father as a professor at Morehead State. His two sisters live in Lexington.
Inspiration
When studying at

5/2/2011

By Colleen Glenn

Photo by Lee Thomas Illustration by Cricket Press   We live in an age of communication. From writing to speaking to texting to social networking, we are constantly communicating with others. The way that we communicate — the words that we use, the style with which we deliver them, and the mode of delivery — determines the impact and effectiveness of our messages.   Realizing the importance of training students to be skilled writers and communicators, educators across the country are beginning to place a top priority on the study of written and spoken language. At the forefront of this movement, the UK College of Arts & Sciences has launched the Division of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media.   “Rhetoric,” Roxanne Mountford, director of the new division, explains, “is a term that encompasses all forms of communication.”  
4/29/2011
Adam Banks, an Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media in the Department of English continues his efforts to strengthen the Black community in Lexington. Currently, he's involved with the King Mixtape Project taking place at St. Paul AME Church. Read the full story from The Key Newsjournal.

Article Date: 4/29/2011
4/29/2011
Adam Banks, an Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media in the Department of English continues his efforts to strengthen the Black community in Lexington. Currently, he's involved with the King Mixtape Project taking place at St. Paul AME Church. Read the full story from The Key Newsjournal.

Article Date: 4/29/2011
4/28/2011

 A University of Kentucky graduate student in the Department of Sociology with dreams of conducting field research on substance abuse treatment programs for women and children is well on her way, thanks to a highly competitive grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NIH National Research Training Award Program has awarded second year doctoral student Kathi Harp its prestigious Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for Individual Predoctoral Fellows.

Harp, who is interested in substance abuse treatment programs designed specifically for women with children, will focus on understanding how custody loss is related to substance use and criminal behaviors among African-American mothers.

"I am focusing on African-American women

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