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Kentucky Women in the Civil Rights Era: Randolph Hollingsworth

Kentucky has a vast and varied history, but there are still pieces of its past that lay undiscovered. Randolph Hollingsworth, a historian working at the University of Kentucky, taught a course in Kentucky women's history during the Civil Rights era. Hollingsworth's students dug through archives, drafted papers, and even created some new Wikipedia pages in the History of women in Kentucky category. The students' findings and discussions are all available at the Kentucky Women in the Civil Rights Era website.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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Meeting Oral History's Challenge: Doug Boyd

Doug Boyd is the Director of the Louie B Nunn Center for Oral History, part of the University of Kentucky Libraries. The great thing about oral history is its subjectivity and content; the not-so-great thing about it is that most of it is in analog format, un-transcribed, and time-consuming for researchers to use. Boyd and his team have been working diligently on software known as the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer, which will enable users to synch up transcribed interviews to their place in an audio or video recording. It will also enable easier use for un-transcribed documents, making access more feasible for researchers and casual listeners alike.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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GIS Workshop: Matthew Wilson

Building bridges between campus and community, Matthew Wilson's GIS Workshop course will connect various Fayette and Lawrence county organizations with groups of students to develop partnerships, gather data for GIS analyses, and create unique maps. GIS, an acronym for 'geographic information sciences,' examines intersections of technology, cartography and culture. 

This podcast was produced by Samuel Burchett.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Wordcast #3: Twitter

In Wordcast #3, WRD 110 students Tyler Davenport and Elizabeth Kunnecke discuss the role Twitter plays in their reading and writing habits. Tyler and Elizabeth took their WRD 110 in the A&S Wired program, where all students use iPads in their courses. Yet, as they talk about in this brief interview, social media like Twitter can be useful for thinking about writing in lots of different ways.

WRD 324: Writing Center Peer Tutoring with Judith Gatton Prats

Judith Gatton Prats is the Director of UK’s Writing Center and a Senior Lecturer in the Division of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media. Next semester, Gatton Prats will be teaching a class, “Writing Center Peer Tutoring” (AS 300/WRD 324), which will help students prepare to be peer tutors in the writing center. The class is one of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media’s groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012. For more information about the Writing Center, visit their WordPress and Facebook page.

This podcast was produced by Christina Buckner

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

WRDcast: Revisions

Revision is one of the most challenging, exciting, and important parts of the writing process. Students in WRD 110 and 111 often learn new revision strategies, but they might not realize that their instructors are often going though the same revision processes! Wordcast #2 features two WRD instructors, Jason Helms and Craig Crowder, discussing their experiences with revision. This podcast features images from Dr. Helms dissertation, which he is currently revising into a book manuscript.

WRD 420: Feminist Rhetorics with Katherine Rogers-Carpenter

What do Aspasia (the companion of Pericles), Sojourner Truth (the orator of the famous "Ain't I a Woman?" speech), and the 1990s Riot Grrrl movement have in common? They will all be featured in Katherine Rogers-Carpenter's "Feminist Rhetorics" (WRD 420/A&S 300), which will examine the speeches and texts of women whose voices have led to lasting social changes in their community and in a global context. The class, which will trace feminist rhetorics from Ancient Greece to contemporary feminist theory, is one of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media's groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012.

This podcast was produced by Christina Buckner.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

WRD 205: Screen/Writing with Joshua Abboud

Have you sent an email, written a text message, or posted on a social media site today? If you have, then you have communicated via screen. From the way televisions have shaped family dynamics in the home, to the way cell phones and computers have influenced grammar and penmanship, the screen pervades our ways of communicating. Joshua Abboud will address the interrelationship between the screen and writing in "Screen/Writing" (WRD 205/ENG 305), one of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Media's groundbreaking course offerings for Spring 2012.   

This podcast was produced by Christina Buckner.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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