lecture

“Feebler Voices?” Men in the American Women's Rights Movement, 1830-1890

 

WHAT: “Feebler Voices?” Men in the American Women's Rights Movement, 1830-1890
WHO: Professor Hélène Quanquin, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3)
WHERE: Niles Gallery, Lucile Little Fine Arts Library
WHEN: Monday, August 27th 3:00 pm

 

Professor Hélène Quanquin (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3) is a well-regarded historian of American culture with particular expertise on the history of feminism in the US, the history of American reform, and the history of masculinity in the US. Professor Quanquin will be on campus as part of the Global Connections initiative, a project which links courses at UK to courses taught at universities around the world. As part of this program, Professor Quanquin is team-teaching with Professor Kathi Kern History 405: The History of Women in the United States, 1900-present, offered this fall.

 

Professor Quanquin’s lecture is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the University of Kentucky History Department.

 

Date: 
Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - 3:18pm to 4:18pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Fine Arts Library

Composition, Design, and Intent: Arturo Sandoval

Arturo Sandoval, a professor in the College of Fine Arts, discussed representations of beauty and diversity through the work of Appalachian quilt artists. He used the international art quilt competition Quilt National biannual as his main research reference. Quilt National is described as a trendsetter in the fiber art fild and displays the most important and innovative art quilts from around the world. Sandoval's presentation guided attendees through a variety of fiber arts and mixed media quilts. These art quilts take a traditional Appalachian art form and bring it to the world of fine art.

This podcast is a recording of his lecture on May 21st, 2012, at Shanghai University. The session was part of the Symposium on Globalization, Identity, and Cultural Diversity

Produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Insecurities of Money

A lecture by Jane I. Guyer given on April 20th, 2012 at the University of Kentucky Singletary Center.

The 2012 Van Winter Memorial Lecture: Paul Steinhardt and Quasicrystals

Each year, the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Physics and Astronomy jointly organize the Van Winter Memorial Lecture, which brings in distinguished speakers to give lectures on matters of common interest to mathematicians and physicists.

This year's speaker is Paul Steinhardt, professor of physics and astrophysics at Princeton University, and director of the Princeton Center for Theoretical Sciences. In this podcast, we spoke to Sumit Das, who will be hosting the lecture, about some of professor Steinhardt's research.

Professor Steinhardt's lecture will be titled, "Once Upon a Time in Kamchatka: the Extraordinary Search for Natural Quasicrystals." The presentation will be on Friday, March 23, from 3:15 pm to 4:15 pm, in room 139 of the Chemistry-Physics building.

In short, a quasicrystal is a type of structure that shows rotational symmetry, but is not periodic -- it doesn't have a pattern that repeats over a distance. Quasicrystals can be composed of sets of a few shapes that are arranged to fill up a space, and although they may have radial patterns, these do not repeat around the crystal in any noticeable order. Usually, it has been thought that crystals can only have two-, four-, or six-sided radial patterns, but quasicrystals can have five-sided rotational symmetry as well, such as in these structures:

A Penrose tiling of thick and thin rhombi.An atomic model of fivefold icosahedral-Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal surface.A Penrose tiling using thick and thin rhombi.

 

 

 

 

 

This podcast was produced by Stephen Gordinier.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The 18th Annual Black Women's Conference: Melynda Price

Melynda Price is a professor in the College of Law, and is the organizer for the 2012 Annual Black Women's Conference, which is in its 18th year. It will take place from March 22nd until the 24th, at various locations on UK's campus and the Lyric Theatre. The African American and Africana Studies program is sponsoring the conference, which is titled "Learning the Ropes: Black Girlhood, Identity, and the Power of Play." It will be free and is open to the public.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Queen With Six Fingers: Dispelling Historical Myths with Susan Bordo

Susan Bordo is a professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at UK. On March 20th, 2012, professor Bordo will present a lecture, “The Queen with Six Fingers: Origins of Popular Myths about Anne Boleyn.” The lecture will be at 4pm in the president’s room at the UK Singletary Center for the Arts, and will address popular myths about Anne Boleyn, one of the wives of Henry XIII. Bordo's research on Boleyn has culminated in an upcoming book, "The Creation of Anne Boleyn." 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Dirk Sacré and Literary Latin: Terrence Tunberg

Latin may not be the standard language in everyday conversation anymore, but its use spans well after the fall of the Roman empire. In fact, a visiting scholar will be visiting UK on March 5th to talk about Latin's lasting literary legacy. Dirk Sacré, a professor at the Catholic University of Louvain Belgium, is going to present the talk "A Vast and Unexplored Continent: the Latin Literature of the 18th Century, at noon in room 208 of the Whitehall Classroom Building.

In this podcast, Terrence Tunberg, a professor in the Division of Classics and the Director of the UK Institute for Latin Studies, describes the importance of Latin in modern literature, and a bit about the lecture and Sacré's research. The talk is in honor of the 10th anniversary of the Graduate Curriculum in Latin Studies, based in the Division of Classics in MCLLC. The event is co-sponsored by the Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, the Department of History, and the Department of Philosophy.

This podcast was produced by Sam Burchett and Cheyenne Hohman.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Race, Class, and Drag: Rusty Barrett

Rusty Barrett is an assistant professor in the Linguistics program. On February 16th, 2012, Barrett will present a lecture, “Sickening Queens: Ethnic and Class Difference in Drag.” The lecture is at 4pm in the President’s Room at the Singletary Center for the Arts, and will address ways in which drag performances reflect social and cultural differences related to class and ethnicity. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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