geology

Research Highlights: Looking Back at 45 Years of Geology

Date: 
Thursday, January 23, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
303 Slone Building, UK campus
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Seeing No Limitations: Peter Price

One of the oldest traditions in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences is its Geology Field Camp. Those who have been a part of this tradition never forget their experiences, the bonds they formed, or what they learned. 
 
University of Kentucky alumni Peter Price was one of those lucky enough to participate in the Geology Field. We sat down with Price at a Field Camp reunion where he talked about his own personal experience at the camp and why his time at UK was so crucial to pursuing his life goals.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Testing Your Mettle: Michael Borque

One of the oldest traditions in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences is its Geology Field Camp. Those who have been a part of this tradition never forget their experiences, the bonds they formed, or what they learned. 
 
One such participant is University of Kentucky alumni Michael Borque. We caught up with Borque at a Geology Field Camp reunion where he discussed how the hands-on experience provided at the camp uniquely prepared him for his future.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Breaking Ground: Women in Earth and Environmental Sciences

Thanks to the growth of women in STEM fields over the past few years, this dream career is possible for a growing number of women.

Kentucky Geological Survey Research Published in New Book

Homes and other structures may suffer severe damages when the shale expands and heaves, according to research conducted at the University of Kentucky.

How To Rock the Geology World: Terry O'Hare

Terry O’Hare, who finished his time at UK with a degree in BS in Geology in 1980, has gone on to start his own company. At the Field Camp Reunion in 2013, he told us about his experiences at UK and at Field Camp, his thoughts on how to succeed with a degree in Geology, and how things have changed since he graduated. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman and recorded by Laura Sutton

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Journeys to the Center of the Earth: Vanessa Santos

Geologist Vanessa Santos has seen a lot of our planet – inside and out! Since graduating from the University of Kentucky, Santos has worked all over the globe, following her passion for earth sciences, and is currently working with Agapito Associates in Colorado. In this podcast, she talks about her experiences in the UK Geology department (now called the Earth & Environmental Sciences Department), and how students can become successful in their field.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Meet The Newest EES Faculty Member: Michael McGlue

My research aims to answer questions related to environmental change and energy resources through field and ship-based examinations of the sedimentary rock record.

Sesquicentennial Stories: From Geology Professor to the College's First Dean

In celebration of the University of Kentucky's upcoming sesquicentennial in 2015, the 61st of 150 weekly installments remembers the accomplishments of Dean Arthur McQuiston Miller, for whom Miller Hall is named.

What's New in Science, Dave Moecher - What’s New with New Madrid?

What's New in Science University of Kentucky Dave Moecher

Part 4 of 4: What’s New with New Madrid? Surprisingly, the New Madrid seismic zone is considered as high of a seismic risk than the San Andreas Fault zone in California. This section highlights the apparent inconsistency with present estimates of seismic risk in the U.S. and Japan. Estimates of earthquake recurrence intervals can also be obtained from paleoseismology: evidence of prehistoric earthquakes preserved in the rock and sediment record.

Links: iris.edu/servlet/eventserver/map.do youtube.com/watch?v=hZIzq-GFNtM&feature=youtu.be youtube.com/watch?v=AontqlzLg8I earthscope.org/samples/load_viewer

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