By Jennifer T. Allen


J.C. Eaves made expanding the study of mathematics throughout Kentucky one of his life’s missions.

"I remember my father telling me the story of how he visited high schools in 119 of Kentucky’s 120 counties," said Jim Eaves, his son. "He put a great importance on math education in Kentucky high schools."

J.C. Eaves grew up in Muhlenberg County in a large family with 11 siblings. He came to UK and earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in mathematics before joining the U.S. Navy during World War II. After the war, Eaves earned his doctorate at the University of North Carolina and, eventually, his path brought him back to his beloved state of Kentucky.

Jim Eaves grew up at the University of Kentucky. His family moved to Lexington when he was in the second grade, when his father became head of the Department of


By Amanda Lee

Tiffany Barnes, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky's Department of Political Science, will be honored with the American Political Science Association's (APSA) Alan Rosenthal Prize for her book "Gendering Legislative Behavior." She will be presented with the award at the APSA national meeting in September in California. 

This award encourages young scholars to study questions of importance to legislators and legislative staff. These scholars are also expected to conduct research that has potential application to strengthen the practice of democracy. 

"I am excited to see research about the important role women play in politics receiving national


By Megan Foltz

Danielle Galyer competed on Kentucky women's swimming and diving team. Photo courtesy of UK Athletics.

Growing up in Greenville, South Carolina, Danielle Galyer did not realize how prominent swimming was in her home state. However, the tough competition didn’t stop her from excelling. She began swimming at the age of 6 and just nine short years later at the age of 15, Galyer competed in her first Olympic trials.

“It was really good for me to go the first time and get the stress level of it all out of the way. It’s a really good experience because it is the elite of the elite,” she said.

With a strong work ethic and sense of commitment instilled by her parents, Galyer decided to attend the University of Kentucky on a swimming scholarship. “It was the one


By Kathy Johnson

Claire Renzetti, professor and chair of the Department of Sociology in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has been chosen to receive a leadership award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems (SSSP).

The national organization promotes and protects sociological research and teaching on significant problems of social life and encourages the application of scientific method and theory to the study of vital social problems. Renzetti will receive the Doris Wilkinson Faculty Leadership Award at SSSP's national meeting in Montreal in August.

Named for UK Sociology 


Chenlu Ke and Jiaying Weng, doctoral students of Statistics at the University of Kentucky, were awarded the Boyd Harshbarger Travel Award for their participation in the NSF/R.L. Anderson Student Poster Session. Their awards supported the presentation of original research at the 2017 Summer Research Conference (SRC) hosted by the Southern Regional Council on Statistics (SRCOS) from June 4th to June 7th, 2017. The Boyd Harshbarger Travel Awards cover the conference registration, up to 1/2 of the conference hotel cost, and mileage from the student's university.  SRCOS awarded on a competitive basis a number of Boyd Harshbarger travel awards to graduate students presenting a poster during the NSF/RL Anderson Student Poster Session. To be eligible for this award, both students submitted an abstract for their poster, a CV, and a letter of support from their Advisor. 


By Karlie Kinneer

Following the completion of her stellar University of Kentucky career, senior swimmer Danielle Galyer was named to the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) Academic All-America At-Large First Team for the second consecutive year, the organization announced Thursday afternoon.

“It’s a culmination of her outstanding career both as a student as an athlete at Kentucky,” said head coach Lars Jorgensen. “She’s been a role model for the entire swimming and diving program over the past four years — a perfect example of achieving at the highest level inside and outside of the classroom.”

Galyer is just the second Wildcat in program history to earn First Team Academic All-America in consecutive seasons


By Whitney Hale

Five playwrights have been named finalists for the 2017 Prize for Women Playwrights presented by the Kentucky Women Writers Conference (KWWC). Award-winning playwright 


By Julie Wrinn

AS A SENIOR MANAGER IN FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT for the global management and investment consulting firm Accenture, Blair West (B.A. 2007) of Midway, Ky., has traveled a long way in a short period of time. She arrived at the University of Kentucky in 2004 with no Advanced Placement credits and graduated three and a half years later, obtained her M.B.A. in London, and now works in New York City.   West credits her mother with advising her to enroll in 18 hours nearly every semester at UK. “Taking 18 hours was not too cumbersome,” she said. “I could still have a life. I did get a lot of parking tickets though.” She even made time to take one purely fun class each year, including scuba diving, racquetball, and ice skating.   During her freshman year, West took German 101 and 102 and through those courses learned about the summer Education

By Jenny Wells

Arnold Stromberg, professor and chair of the Department of Statistics in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has been named a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA).

The honor is conferred upon less than one percent of the ASA’s membership, and is comprised of statisticians from academia, business, government and research organizations from around the world.

“I’m grateful to the Department of Statistics, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the university for providing an environment that allowed me to achieve this honor,” Stromberg said.

Stromberg will be officially recognized at an awards ceremony in August during the Joint Statistical Meetings in Baltimore with the other 2017 fellows. He will be recognized for


By Shana Hutchins and Jenny Wells

It’s a material world, and an extremely versatile one at that, considering its most basic building blocks — atoms — can be connected together to form different structures that retain the same composition.

Diamond and graphite, for example, are but two of the many polymorphs of carbon, meaning that both have the same chemical composition and differ only in the manner in which their atoms are connected. But what a world of difference that connectivity makes: The former goes into a ring and costs thousands of dollars, while the latter has to sit content within a humble pencil.

The inorganic compound hafnium dioxide commonly used in optical coatings likewise has several polymorphs, including a tetragonal form with highly attractive properties for computer chips and other optical elements. However, because this form is stable only



By Whitney Hale

The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced four UK students have been awarded


By Gail Hairston

University of Kentucky Associate Professor of Psychology Will Gervais is the lead author of the study “How many atheists are there?,” which appears in the current issue of the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. Gervais’ study asserts that there may be many more atheists in the U.S. than society believes.

It's tough to figure out just how religious or nonreligious different populations of people are. Widely cited telephone polls (like Gallup and Pew) suggest U.S. atheist prevalence ranges from 3 percent to 11 percent. But, there's heavy stigma leveled against religious disbelief in the U.S., which might make people reluctant to disclose their lack of belief over the phone to a stranger. Using a subtle, indirect measurement


Middle school students are awed when they get the chance to turn a banana into a percussion instrument at the 2017 Expanding Your Horizons STEM workshop for girls.

Sometime during the transition from middle school to high school, girls often find their early interest in science and math steered in other directions, often toward careers that fit comfortably into a box of more “traditional” women’s roles. A recent daylong workshop at the University of Kentucky sought to stem that tide by introducing 120 Kentucky middle school girls to a challenging STEM career.

A multidisciplinary project, Expanding Your Horizons, focused on countermanding some of the possible reasons that girls’ interest in the sciences flag at a certain age, such as peer pressure or a lack of female role models. During the workshop, the young students met many female


By Jenny Wells

The University of Kentucky’s #IAmAWomanInSTEM project has awarded scholarships to 11 UK students for project proposals that promote STEM education and careers for women.

Females are less likely than their male counterparts to pursue an education in the STEM disciplines, which include science, technology, engineering and math. The #IAmAWomanInSTEM initiative, which launched at UK last year, seeks to change that by recruiting hundreds of female student ambassadors who are encouraging the study of STEM and health care among women at UK, and empowering them to persist in those fields.

“As a public research institution and the state's flagship, UK has an important role in promoting graduation of women in STEM majors,” said Randolph Hollingsworth, assistant provost and advisor of the program


By Gail Hairston

For much of his career, University of Kentucky Professor of Anthropology Christopher Pool has been fascinated by Mexico’s ancient Olmec culture, with its gargantuan heads sculpted in stone and more mundane relics its artisans etched in ceramic.

An expert in Mesoamerica, the evolution of complex societies, political economy and cultural ecology and armed with a voracious curiosity, Pool began his fieldwork at the Olmec site of Tres Zapotes, Mexico, in 1995, some 140 years after a farmworker’s hoe first scraped the top of a buried stone head.

After numerous stone monuments were unearthed at Tres Zapotes, additional evidence of a highly sophisticated ancient culture was discovered. Archaeologists were lured away from Tres Zapotes by the discovery of the remains of several other ancient


By Mallory Powell

From May 22 through June 7, a new summer workshop will introduce high school and undergraduate students to statistics and careers in the field. At “Statistics Facts and Snacks,” students will learn about what a statistician does, requirements to pursue higher education in statistics, and introductory statistical programming techniques. 

The workshop will meet daily from Monday, May 22 through Wednesday, June 7 (excluding Memorial Day), from 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. in the University of Kentucky Multidisciplinary Sciences building, room 333. 

Participants must register to attend, and participants under 18 years old must have a parent or guardian register for them.

The “Statistics Facts and Snacks” summer workshop is presented by the UK College of Arts and Sciences Applied Statistics Lab and the UK Center for Clinical and


By Jenny Wells

Tissue regeneration is complex and involves the dynamic interaction of many cellular and physiological processes. Understanding how these processes interact to regulate regeneration requires working across disciplines. In support of an interdisciplinary approach, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently awarded researchers at the University of Kentucky a five-year, $1.65 million grant from its National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) to study how inflammatory cells can regulate tissue regeneration in mammals.

The research team is led by Ashley Seifert, assistant professor of biology in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, and John Gensel, assistant professor of physiology in the 


By Jenny Wells

Macrophages from an African spiny mouse promote tissue regeneration.

A team of University of Kentucky researchers has discovered that macrophages, a type of immune cell that clears debris at injury sites during normal wound healing and helps produce scar tissue, are required for complex tissue regeneration in mammals. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how immune cells might be harnessed to someday help stimulate tissue regeneration in humans.

“With few examples to study, we know very little about how regeneration works in mammals; most of what we know about organ regeneration comes from studying invertebrates or from research in amphibians and fish,” said Ashley Seifert, senior author of the study and assistant professor of 


By Shana Hutchins and Jenny Wells

The authors observed in real-time the transformation of a HfO2 nanorod from its room temperature to tetragonal phase, at 1000° less than its bulk temperature. Nanorod surfaces and twin boundary defects (pictured here) serve to kinetically trap this phase.


It’s a material world, and an extremely versatile one at that, considering its most basic building blocks — atoms — can be connected together to form different structures that retain the same composition.

Diamond and graphite, for example, are but two of the many polymorphs of carbon, meaning that both have the same chemical composition and differ only in the manner in which their atoms are connected. But what a world of difference that connectivity makes: The former goes into a ring and costs thousands of dollars, while the latter has to sit content within a

Kayvin Ghayoumi receiving an award during the 2017 Regional Undergraduate Chemistry Research Poster Competition

In recognition of his contributions to the field of environmental chemistry Kayvon Ghayoumi is honored with the Division of Environmental Chemistry 2017 Undergraduate award from the American Chemical Society. Ghayoumi earned a B.A. in Chemistry at the University of Kentucky this Spring. His interest in Environmental Chemistry started while taking CHE 565 taught by Dr. Marcelo Guzman, who later became his research supervisor. For his research in collaboration with Assistant Professor Marcelo Guzman and graduate student Evie Zhou, Ghayoumi tackled a current problem studying the photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on nanocomposites that operate under a direct Z-scheme mechanism. Ghayoumi will be starting law school this coming Fall at George Washington University and plans to apply his chemistry knowledge to specialize in both patent and environmental law.


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