News

4/17/2017

By Gail Hairston

The last event of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences’ Civil Life Panel Series’ spring season is slated noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, with two follow-up panel discussions later the same day. The topic is “Science Speaks.”

Allan Butterfield, Alumni Association Endowed Professor of Biological Chemistry; Andrea Erhardt, assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences; Bruce Webb, professor of entomology; and David Weisrock, associate professor of biology, will gather for a lively discussion at noon in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

They will discuss what it means

4/15/2017
Examples of atmospheric particles. Left: clouds over Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii. Right: fog over Cincinnati, Ohio. Credit: Alexis Eugene

Atmospheric aerosols such as smoke, fog, and mist are made of fine solid or liquid particles suspended in air. In the lower atmosphere aerosols play a major role in controlling air quality, as well as in scattering and absorbing sunlight. This interaction of aerosols with light varies widely and depends on their complex chemical composition that rapidly changes under the governing highly reactive conditions found in the atmosphere. Importantly, the mysterious formation of carbon-containing atmospheric particles has intrigued atmospheric scientists during the last decade. This issue demands a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of atmospheric reactions as tackled in a new laboratory study entitled Reactivity of Ketyl and Acetyl Radicals from Direct Solar Actinic Photolysis of Aqueous Pyruvic Acid published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry A.

Examples of
4/14/2017

By Gail Hairston

Molly T. Blasing, assistant professor of Russian studies in the University of Kentucky Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures, has been awarded a 2017 NEH (National Endowment for the Humanities) Summer Stipend, one of only two conferred this year in Kentucky.

She will use the funding to complete research on a final chapter of her book, “Snapshots of the Soul: Photo-Poetic Encounters in Modern Russian Culture.”

Blasing's project examines the relationship between photographic seeing and poetic creation in Russia and the Soviet Union. The book represents an interdisciplinary approach to modern literary studies, visual culture and the social history of technology.

Blasing’s study considers how photography

4/14/2017

By Jenny Wells

 

Lithospheric magnetic field. Video courtesy of European Space Agency (ESA)

A University of Kentucky geophysicist is helping an international team of scientists reveal dramatic new information about the Earth’s magnetic field.

Two years ago, Dhananjay Ravat, who is a professor in the UK Departments of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Physics and Astronomy, was asked by the leader of the Swarm Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility of the European Space Agency (ESA) to collaborate with their team to create a map of the magnetic features of the Earth’s lithosphere. Ravat, who has worked on geophysical data from several space missions around the Earth, Mars and the moon, was intrigued by the Swarm project, and his involvement

4/14/2017

By Whitney Hale and Gail Hairston

 

Watch as contestants at the Brooklyn Book Festival try to figure out what "The Animators," by UK alumna Kayla Rae Whitaker, is all about based only on its cover.

Very few authors find themselves publishing their debut novel with a name as big as Random House, much less earning acclaim from critics such as The New York Times. But for University of Kentucky alumna Kayla Rae Whitaker, these are natural next steps for someone who showed tremendous promise during her college career. Whitaker’s novel, "The Animators," was released earlier this year.

Aspiring writers from the university and across the nation will get to hear Whitaker's own take on her early success and hear a reading from "The

4/13/2017

By Gail Hairston

The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) recently named Brenna Reinhart Byrd Teacher of the Year. Byrd is a University of Kentucky assistant professor of German studies. As the southern regional representative chosen by SCOLT, she will compete for Teacher of the Year at the national level at the annual conference of the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages. 

Byrd was named Kentucky's Teacher of the Year by the Kentucky World Languages Association in September 2016.

Byrd has over 15 years of education and teaching experience in the German language. She received her bachelor’s degree in German and a minor in linguistics from the University of Texas at Austin and both her master’s and doctoral degrees in Germanic linguistics from University of California, Los Angeles, before

4/12/2017

By Gail Hairston

 

The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced Friday that University of Kentucky’s Peter Joseph Kalliney and 172 other scholars, artists and scientists in the United States and Canada have received a coveted Guggenheim Fellowship.

According to the foundation’s announcement, successful candidates were appointed on the basis of “prior achievement and exceptional promise.”

“It’s exciting to name 173 new Guggenheim Fellows,” said the President of the Guggenheim Foundation Edward Hirsch in a media release. “These artists and writers, scholars and scientists, represent the best of the best. Each year since (its establishment in) 1925, the Guggenheim Foundation has bet

4/12/2017

By Kathy Johnson and Terry Sebastian

 

A University of Kentucky sociology class won the #VoiceofJustice video contest, as announced via Facebook Live yesterday by Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear and Eileen Recktenwald, director of the Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs (KASAP).

The competition called upon college students to submit 30-second videos to promote the free and confidential Sexual Assault Hotline, 800-656-HOPE, and to increase awareness of sexual assault and active bystanding to help prevent it.

A panel of survivors and victim advocates selected the video “Stand with us” as the overall $500 video prizewinner. Students enrolled in Emily Bonistall

4/10/2017

By Dominique Page

This week, the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW) will present the fourth lecture of their series "Researching Violence: Challenges, Strategies, and Practices."

Claire Renzetti, professor and chair of the UK Department of Sociology, and the Judy Conway Patton Endowed Chair for CRVAW, will deliver the lecture titled "Benefits and Challenges of Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk for Studying Violence Against Women" at noon, Wednesday, April 12, in Room 115 of the UK College of Nursing.

The endowed faculty at the center are presenting topics over the next several years regarding the challenges of measuring violence against women and potential strategies for conducting this research. The focus is on conceptual and

4/10/2017

By Gail Hairston

The fourth event for the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Civic Life seminar series will be moderated by Molly Thomasy Blasing, assistant professor of Russian studies in the college’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC). The event will be noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

This week’s topic is “Russia and the World in 2017."

A panel discussion will be moderated by Blasing with: Gregory Hall (Patterson School); Karen Petrone (History); Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby (MCLLC);

4/9/2017

A research study performed by Dr. Dmytro Havrylyuk, Dr. David Heidary, Leona Nease, Dr. Sean Parkin, and Dr. Edith Glazer was profiled on the back cover of the journal The European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry for a special cluster issue titled "Metal Anticancer Complexes – Activity, Mechanism of Action and Future Perspectives". 

From the description of the cover art: "This cover feature shows a selection of inorganic elements that are used in new anticancer agents described in this cluster issue. The hourglass symbolizes the time-sensitive nature of chemotherapy treatment as well as the spatial and temporal control achieved with light-activated compounds. The strained complex on the left can eject a ligand to form covalent adducts with DNA, while the unstrained complex on the right generates ROS. In both cases pyridylbenzazole ligands (X = CH, NH, O, S) were

4/7/2017
By Gail Hairston Throughout Andrew Byrd’s successful career in academia, he has pushed to understand ancient languages to a depth no one has before. His goal was to understand how languages spoken thousands of years ago actually sounded.   That scholarly obsession has led Byrd, an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Kentucky, to places and experiences he never imagined. He just completed creating ancient languages for National Geographic Channel’s new series “Origins: The Journey of Humankind.”   The global notoriety began in 2013 when Byrd’s work caught the attention of the Archaeological Institute of America’s Archaeology magazine. The magazine published an online piece that included recordings of Byrd reading two fables he had constructed in the prehistoric language known as Proto-Indo-European (PIE). It wasn’t long before he was featured in several
4/7/2017
By Whitney Harder   Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.   Kirk is editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel for the 2016-17 academic year and was chosen for her pursuit of open records from UK. In January, a judge ruled in favor of UK's position in the case involving the privacy of victim survivors of sexual misconduct. The Kernel is appealing.   Kirk, along with nine other winners, is profiled in the May issue of Glamour. The story is available online at www.glamour.com/story/2017-college-women-of-the-year-winners.     All winners receive a cash prize, a trip to New York City, introductions to top professionals in a variety of fields, national recognition in the magazine, and hair
4/7/2017
By Loretta Stafford A team of University of Kentucky undergraduates has advanced to the semifinals of "Heroes of the Dorm," an international video gaming tournament centered around the popular online game "Heroes of the Storm."   The team, aptly named "Scratch Em," will go head-to-head with Louisiana State University's team at the Heroic Four competition this Saturday, April 8, at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.   Heroes of the Dorm is a free-entry tournament open to college students in the United States and Canada. Eligible teams consist of five to six participants who attend the same school. Over 200 teams registered to compete in this year's tournament, each vying for an opportunity at the grand prize — a three-year, full tuition scholarship.   The members of UK’s “Scratch Em” are two sets of three brothers: freshman biology major Daniel Pina; sophomore
4/6/2017
By Connie Sapienza   Front row (l to r): Alyssa Mertka, Meg Coppala, Hadeel Abdallah and Susie Smith. Middle row (l to r): Meghana Kudrimoti and Michael Regard. Back row (l to r); Beau Revlett, Ben Jones, Eric Poore and Nate Cortas. Not pictured: Sophia Decker and Amaris Wade   The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has selected 12 exceptional undergraduates as new scholars for the university's Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 academic years. Gaines Fellowships are given in recognition of outstanding academic performance, demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, an interest in public issues, and a desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities.   Gaines Fellowships are awarded for the tenure of a student's junior and senior years, or for the last two years of a five-year program;
4/6/2017
By Loretta Stafford University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) is partnering with the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures in the UK College of Arts and Sciences to welcome University of Oregon Professor Stephen Durrant as the next speaker of the 2017 Distinguished Scholars Series. Durrant's lecture examining historiography in Chinese, Greek and Hebrew society will take place from 3:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 11, at the Alumni Gallery located in the William T. Young Library. The lecture is free and open to the public.   Stephen Durrant's lecture, "What Does It Mean to Write History? Perspectives From Ancient China, Greece and Israel," focuses on the earliest historical texts of each civilization, and investigates how those writings shape what follows. While there are many similarities between these traditions of historiography, the
4/6/2017
  Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.    By Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser   Noor Alattar, an English doctoral student from Iraq, will never forget the words of encouragement her professor, Michelle Sizemore, shared with her when she first arrived at the University of Kentucky.    "Everything was new to me," Alattar said. "She would never just encourage you with empty words. She was more than welcoming."   In fact, that encouragement is why Alattar nominated Sizemore to win a 2017 Great Teacher Award. Watch why this English professor's words were so meaningful to Alattar by clicking on the video above.      Sizemore
4/6/2017
By Gail Hairston   Karen Kelsky, the successful founder and president of The Professor Is In, an academic-career consulting business, visits the University of Kentucky campus April 7.   Kelsky will have a busy schedule on Friday, mentoring graduate students, post-doctoral students, faculty and staff in preparing for successful careers both inside and outside academia. Her visit is part of the annual "Life After Grad School" series, organized by the Graduate Student Congress.    Once a tenured anthropology professor at the University of Oregon and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she now runs her successful advising business, but is also a frequent columnist as well as a frequent source for other writer’s articles in The Chronicle of Higher Education. She is the author of “The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. into a Job.” For more
4/4/2017
By Jennifer Allen and Gail Hairston   Karen Petrone in the Department of History is the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences’ 2017-18 A&S Distinguished Professor.   “Since joining the faculty of the college in 1994, Petrone has established a record of outstanding teaching, scholarship and service that is recognized by her colleagues both here at UK and in the discipline of history,” said Mark Lawrence Kornbluh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.   In 1998, within four years of her arrival at UK, Petrone was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Teaching. She has taught a wide variety of courses ranging from freshman survey offerings in European history to advanced graduate seminars in Russian history. She was very active in the college’s former Gender and Women’s Studies Program (now department) and was a leader in developing UK’s Working
4/4/2017
By Gail Hairston   The third event for the College of Arts and Sciences Civic Life seminar series will be hosted by Professor of Sociology Carlos de la Torre and Professor of History Tracy Campbell. The event will be noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library. It is free and open to the public.   This week’s topic is “Populist Moments and the Future of Democracy Under Trump."   Donald Trump’s presidency is bringing American populism from the margins to the center of power. He uses populist rhetoric and strategies to confront “the establishment,” promising to end the neoliberal multicultural consensus that linked globalization and the cultural recognition of different identity groups such as women, Muslims, African Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans and the LGBTQ communities.   The Oxford English Dictionary defines

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