Four UK Biologists Form Regeneration "Cluster"

How are some animals able to regrow body parts following injury? Why can't humans do the same thing? Four professors in the University of Kentucky in the Department of Biology—Ann Morris, Randal Voss, Jeramiah Smith, and Ashley Seifert—are undertaking the basic scientific research needed to begin to answer these questions. Each scientist approaches the problem from a different angle, focusing on different aspects of regeneration, and using different vertebrate models. Together, they make up the core of an unofficial regeneration "cluster" within the department.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media

KGS Says New Madrid Earthquake Threat is Overstated

Researchers at the Kentucky Geological Survey say maps published by the U.S. Geological Survey overstate the earthquake threat in Western Kentucky and the surrounding region.

Kentucky NSF EPSCoR Success Stories Featured in Video Series

Schyler Nunziata is a first-year Ph.D. student in biology at the University of Kentucky, and she’s the first success story highlighted in a new video series.

UK Researchers Speak Out: Sequester Will Squelch Scientists-in-Training

“From the standpoint of training the next generation of highly skilled professors, industrial scientists, people to work in government laboratories, people to advance our understanding of disease and advance the next generation of therapies, it will be profoundly devastating for this generation of students.”

Suburban Ecology and Invasive Species Research Experience at UK

Through a National Science Foundation program called Research Experiences for Undergraduates, 10 students from colleges across the country spent 10 weeks studying suburban ecology and invasive species at or nearby UK's Ecological Research Facility.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media



Kentucky NSF EPSCoR success stories: Schyler Nunziata



Schyler Nunziata is a first-year Ph.D. student in biology at the University of Kentucky, and she's just one of the young scientists that can testify to the impact of Kentucky's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, known as Kentucky EPSCoR. Nunziata, who works in David Weisrock's lab that combines genetics, genomics and evolutionary biology, received two grants from the National Science Foundation through EPSCoR. The first $5,000 grant, while she was a masters student at Eastern Kentucky University, funded her entire thesis project which involved collecting two lined salamanders, developing genetic markers, and genotyping the salamanders. The second grant, as a Ph.D. student at the University of Kentucky, allowed her to prepare a pilot study. Nunziata says, "EPSCoR helps get students into research, helps develop them as scientists. For me, it allowed me to delve deeper into a field that I was interested in and find out what research was like and what a career in research would entail. EPSCoR has had a huge impact on my career path."

Visit the Weisrock Lab website -

Kentucky EPSCoR has been the channel for over $430 million in research funding to the Commonwealth's academic institutions. Over 80 percent of this funding has been competitively won from federal research programs. In addition to supporting 1,400 research jobs and providing research training for over 2,300 students, this funding has created 21 research centers and major research initiatives on Kentucky's campuses. For more, visit and

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit A direct link to this story is .

The UK videos were produced by REVEAL (, a site that offers multimedia with the stories behind the leading-edge research under way in colleges across the University of Kentucky campus.



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