online education

Summer Sessions Are Just Around the Corner

 

Students - don’t forget to check out and register for A&S summer classes. A&S is offering nearly 200 courses both online and campus-based for summer 2012. These courses are designed for students who want to make progress toward a UK degree over the summer, gain extra credit hours, explore new topics, and have flexibility with busy summer schedules. With courses ranging from anthropology and chemistry to political science and statistics, A&S has something for everyone.

The courses will be offered in two summer sessions:

Summer Session I
4-week Session (May 8-June 5)
First 6-week session (May 8-June 19)

Summer Session II
8-week session (June 7-August 2)
Second 6-week session (June 21-August 2)

For more information about summer courses, visit http://www.as.uky.edu/summer-online-courses or contact your academic advisor.


Enroll this summer and see where A&S summer courses can take you!

Boost Your IT IQ!

Since the 2012 Winter Intercession, A&S has been offering a series of courses called "IT IQ," which engages students and introduces them to a variety of technologies at their disposal. The courses are generally six weeks long, are worth one credit hour, and provide students with a technological framework for academics. In this short podcast, three key players in IT IQ (Derek Eggers, Carly Germann, and Christian Ecker) talked about what students get in a typical course, what sorts of technologies are taught and how they're applied in an academic setting.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

HIS 109: History of the U.S. Since 1877

This course examines American history from 1877 to the present: political, economic, and social—Gilded Age, Progressive Era, New Deal, Age of Affluence and of Limits, Great Society and two Great Wars. You will find how much, how little, America has lived up to its ideals: how it grew from a nation of farms and cotton mills to an industrial giant; how it became a world power and what problems this created. Because we will cover over 130 years of American history, we will focus our coverage on moments in the American past where the rights of citizens contracted or expanded. This question of national belonging will serve as a unifying theme for the course. Who counts as an American citizen and when? How do these questions of the contested nature of citizenship reflect more broadly on our nation's past? On our future? Students will engage in this study using a number of methods: analyzing primary documents, reading the work of historians, listening to lectures, engaging in discussion board, participating in simulations, and preparing a multi-media presentation of their own design.

LIN/ENG 211: Introduction to Linguistics

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human language, with an emphasis on the fundamental principles of linguistic theory, and applications of these principles in the investigation of grammatical structure. Through the course of the semester, you will learn to analyze the primary areas of grammar found in all human languages. These will include phonetics (the production and perception of language sounds), phonology (the ways in which sounds are organized in a language), morphology (the structure of words), syntax (the ways in which words are combined into sentences), and semantics (how language conveys meaning). Credit will not be given to students who already have credit for ENG 414G. (Same as ENG 211.)

STA 210: Introduction to Statistical Reasoning

The goal of this course is to help students develop or refine their statistical literacy skills. Both the informal activity of human inference arising from statistical constructs, as well as the more formal perspectives on statistical inference found in confidence intervals and hypothesis tests are studied. Throughout, the emphasis is on understanding what distinguishes good and bad inferential reasoning in the practical world around us.

PS 391: Special Topics in Political Science: Film and Politics

Course will focus on selected topics drawn from various areas of political science taught by faculty members with special interests and competence. May be repeated in courses of differing topics to a maximum of 12 credits.

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