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Celebrate A&S: 2012 Hall of Fame Inductee Matt Cutts

Matt Cutts is a native of Morehead, Kentucky and graduated from UK with degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics in 1995. A Singletary Scholar, Gaines Fellow and recipient of the Dean's Scholarship in Arts and Sciences, Cutts also worked for the Department of Defense as part of UK’s co-operative program.

One of the very first 100 Google employees, Matt Cutts is now the head of Google’s webspam engineering team. He wrote the first version of Safesearch, Google’s family filter, and works on improving search results. As a crucial member of the Google team and an avid blogger, Matt Cutts is one of the most public faces of the world’s largest search engine.

Teaching Tools for Public Participation and Digital Mapping Workshop

This workshop explores how community mapping and geospatial technology can be incorporated in the classroom. A primary goal of this technique is helping students develop and demonstrate higher order thinking skills that engage them in the process of discovering and answering questions about their community. The goal is to introduce a range of simple open source/open access mapping tools that can be easily leveraged in class projects to highlight local issues and initiate conversations about community dynamics, space, and priorities.

Effective use of search engines or: How I became the family tech support guy

You might be surprised how many questions already have answers, simply floating in the internether. As a person who's grown up alongside the world wide web, I've come to rely on internet queries to quickly answer a question or offer instruction. The key to finding this information is to be able to effectively use search engines to navigate the web. For this post, I'll be talking about methods I use for a Google search. If you're using a different engine, your search results may vary. I will also be using square brackets and italics to denote example queries, such as this [ query ] for the word query.

Phrase searching

When you search for a phrase, such as [ which seat should I take ], you may notice that you get a variety of results with the words in any order. While in many cases this is fine, it can also be very helpful to use double quotes in your search to contain a specific phrase. The results will contain the keywords in the exact order. This can be used to find a reference, song lyrics, and is especially useful for finding information on an error message. The query [ "which seat should I take" ]  will give you more specific results.

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