gis

Introduction to New Maps Plus

Why New Maps Plus?

The New Maps Plus graduate programs at the University of Kentucky offer students a challenging, intensive, digital mapping curriculum that emphasizes the acquisition of technical skills—coding, GIS, web development—while also preparing students to critically address the complexity of today’s information ecosystem.

Read more about how New Maps Plus is unique: newmapsplus.uky.edu/all-about

Matthew Wilson: New Lines

New Lines

Matthew W. Wilson, Harvard University and University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky Geography Colloquium 15 November 2013

In the twenty years that have passed since the fabled Friday Harbor meetings of November 1993, where GIS practitioners and critical human geographers agreed to a cease-fire, the GIS & Society agenda has been reflected upon, pushed forward, and diffracted in few (but intellectually significant) arenas. Critical, participatory, public participation, and feminist GIS have given way more recently to qualitative GIS, GIS and non-representational theory, and the spatial digital humanities. Traveling at the margins of these efforts has been a kind of social history of mapping and GIS. And while GIScience has been conversant and compatible with many of these permutations in the GIS & Society agenda, a social history of mapping and GIS (as signaled most directly by John Pickles in 2004) has perhaps the least potential for tinkering with GIScience practice (see recent conversation between Agnieszka Leszczynski and Jeremy Crampton in 2009). Perhaps this disconnect is growing, as can be witnessed in the feverish emergence of a ‘big data’ analytics/representation perspective within the contemporary GISciences (alongside the growth of funding paths around cyberinfrastructure). What then is the relevance and role of a social history of GIS for GIScience practice? In this presentation, I sketch and reflect upon a diversity of efforts that address this question.

Geography Guest Speaker: Sarah Whatmore

Sarah Whatmore is a Professor and Head of School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford in Oxford, United Kingdom. Her research is in the field of political ecology, examining policy and the actions of humans impact the environment. She is author of Hybrid Geographies: Nature Cultures Spaces (Sage London, 2002). She is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers) and collaborates with researchers around the world.

New Mappings Speaker Series: Michael Goodchild

Michael Goodchild is Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of California Santa Barbara. His research focuses around geographic information represented in computer systems, and how communities are involved in producing maps.

The New Mappings Collaboratory at the University of Kentucky is an effort to build partnerships around new spatial media education and research.

Gabriel’s Map: Cartography and Corpography in Modern War

Dr. Derek Gregory University of British Columbia

January 25, 2013 - Social Theory Lecture "Gabriel’s Map: Cartography and Corpography in Modern War"

New Mappings Speaker Series: Daniel Sui

Dan Sui is Professor and Chair of Geography at The Ohio State University. His current research focuses on volunteered geographic information and the use of social media as a new data source for geographic research as well as the legal and ethical issues of using geospatial technologies in society. The New Mappings Collaboratory at the University of Kentucky hosted Professor Sui, kicking off an effort to build partnerships around new spatial media education and research.

GIS Workshop Strengthens Community Ties

Students in geography Professor Matt Wilson's GIS Workshop course spent the past semester applying the knowledge of geographic technology they gained in the classroom to assist Lexington nonprofit organizations Seedleaf and Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice.

GIS Workshop Community Partners: Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice- Kerby Neill

Kerby Neill, volunteer coordinator for the Central Kentucky Council for Peace and Justice, discusses the council's partnership with Matt Wilson's Geographic Information Systems Workshop at the University of Kentucky.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - gis
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading