evolution

Evolution and Creationism in Kentucky

In the 1920s, many states considered the passage of antievolution laws. Tennessee's famous 1925 Scopes Trial is the best known of these, but such legislation actually first was proposed in Kentucky. However, Kentucky scientists vigorously protested such laws, and the legislature backed down. Antievolutionism in Kentucky did not go away after the Scopes Trial, of course, and has manifested itself in many ways. In 1980-81, the Fayette County Public Schools Board of Education was approached by a citizens group promoting the teaching of creation science; the protracted struggle over what should be taught presaged battles to take place in communities all over the nation regarding state department of education policies, and the recent appearance of recreational facilities promoting creationism. Presentation will be followed by Q&A.

EUGENIE C. SCOTT, National Center for Science Education

Eugenie Carol Scott is an American physical anthropologist, a former university professor, educator, and founding director of the NCSE. She is a nationally recognized expert on evolution and creationism. She has received numerous accolades including 10 honorary degrees and the National Academy of Sciences Public Welfare Medal. She even has an asteroid named after her!

Date: 
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Jacobs' Science Building Room 121
Tags/Keywords:

NATURAL SELECTION

 

Natural selection is most familiar with respect to Darwinian evolution. However, though some biologists will argue that selection acts only on genes, this is a very narrow and restricted view. Selection operates on a variety of environmental phenomena, and at a variety of scales. In hydrology and geomorphology, the principle of gradient selection dictates that the most efficient flow paths are preferred over less efficient ones, and that these paths tend to be reinforced. That’s why water flows organize themselves into channels (more efficient than diffuse flows), and channels into networks. The principle of resistance selection in geomorphology is simply that more resistant features will persist while less resistant ones will be removed more quickly. Thus geomorphic processes select for certain forms and features and against others. Among others, Gerald Nanson, Rowl Twidale, and Luna Leopold have written on selection in geomorphology, and Henry Lin, among others, in hydrology.

 

Principle of gradient selection at work--Board Camp Creek, Arkansas

UK's Impact on the Evolution of Evolution

Kentucky students were introduced to evolutionary theory in 1900. Following the controversy of the 1920s, UK faculty, staff and alumni would play a key role in defending science education and academic freedom.

Harvard Professor to Speak on 'Deep History' of Life on Earth

Dr. Andrew H. Knoll will present "The Deep History of Life: What Kinds of Life Characterized Earth During the PRecambrian?" on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. in Memorial Hall.

The Meaning of Life: Will Gervais

During the 2013 fall semester, University of Kentucky students will have the opportunity to delve into questions that explore some of society's most deeply held beliefs. The ambitiously titled class, "A&S 300: The Meaning of Life - Psychology, Evolution, Religion, and Morality," will be led by Psychology Professor Will Gervais who has focused his research around this very topic.

In the class, students can expect to investigate the psychological and evolutionary underpinnings of religious and moral beliefs through studies of cognitive and evolutionary science. Gervais hopes to use this lens to encourage students to not ask questions around whether or not a higher power exists, but instead question why people believe what they do and the implications of that on society.
 
In this podcast, Gervais touches on these issues and how now more than ever, it's important that we use the tools of science to examine the roles of religion and morality.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

What's New in Science - Randal Voss

Professor Randal Voss of the University of Kentucky Biology Department talks about understanding evolution through the human genome.
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