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Linguistics seminar series: Ashley Stinnett

Ashley Stinnett

Ashley Stinnett, is an assistant professor in the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at Western Kentucky University. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Her areas of specialization are linguistic anthropology with a sub-specialty in applied visual ethnography and educational documentary filmmaking. Her research primarily concerns the sociocultural and linguistic processes in which locally centered, historical and traditional knowledge specific to food are realized and put into daily practice. Ashley researches language production in communities of practice in occupational settings and community driven efforts, specifically related to food production. Additionally, she partners with local community organizations utilizing applied anthropological approaches while synchronously incorporating visual anthropology methodologies in both the practice and the production of visual media materials. Her primary research focuses on language practices of heritage butchers in the Southwestern United States. Her most recent project utilizes linguistic and sensory ethnography in a focus on food fermentation.

Date: 
Friday, February 2, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery, Lucille Little Library
Type of Event (for grouping events):

A guide to Día de los muertos celebrations in Lexington

It’s a good weekend to be a hispanista in Lexington. Granted we’ve had a great fall; from the Lexington Latino Festival to the many activities surrounding the Arts and Sciences Passport ¡Viva México! program, those of us who love the Spanish language and Hispanic culture have been busy. Still, this Friday and Saturday are special. 

This weekend we celebrate Día de los muertos, or Day of the Dead, a well-known holiday that has become increasingly popular in the US. On November 1st and 2nd, families throughout Latin America (but especially in Mexico) build altars and visit cemeteries to remember loved ones who have passed away. The holiday is joyous, despite the macabre theme. Día de los muertos is a time to laugh with death, to accept the fact that we’re all headed that way eventually, and to give those we have lost a place at our table for the night. Here are some suggestions for how you can celebrate this weekend, just follow the hyperlinks to more information about and directions to the events. ¡Qué vivan los muertos!

Preparations

Film as Art - The Agreeable and the Beautiful: Stefan Bird-Pollan

This fall, University of Kentucky Philosophy Professor Stefan Bird-Pollan will be leading a class that hopes to expand the ways in which students interact with film. In the course, PHI 300: The Philosophy of Film, students will examine the aesthetics of film from the early 20th century through the 1970s. Through this aesthetic exploration, Bird-Pollan hopes to expose the ways in which our relationships with films directly impact the way we relate to the rest of the world around us. 
 
In this podcast, Bird-Pollan discusses how the class will address a broad range of films both domestic and foreign; the processes of film creation that shape our interaction with them; and how he hopes to use the class to move past the "I like it or don't" binary. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

What's New in Science - Why does inaccurate focus on gender differences matter? Begin Q&A

What's New in Science Christia Brown

Part 3 of 4: The presentation concludes with consideration of why these stereotypes about gender differences matter. For example, by treating children differently, we can actually shape their brain development. Post presentation questions begin. Many questions address cultural vs. biological differences, and the growing trend in public schools of teaching boys and girls differently based on presumed (but inaccurate) learning differences. Several topics of the presentation are expanded upon through questions.

Caribbean Culture at Meadowthorpe Elementary Heritage Night

Four UK students, Lodz Pierre, Cherley Fleury, Tehilla Adams, and Olimpia Ferguson; had the opportunity to share some Caribbean culture with students and parents at Meadowthorpe Elementary for a Heritage Night that the school was hosting. Dr. Jacqueline Couti, Assistant Professor of French in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures as well as the advisor to the Caribbean Student Assocation, choreographed the dance.

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