classics

Antiquity and Cultural Memory in the Maghreb (Morocco & Tunisia)

MCLLC ~ Bluegrass Classics Lectures 

Antiquity and Cultural Memory in the Maghreb (Morocco & Tunisia)

 

Prof. Dr. Anja Bettenworth

Professorin für Klassische Philologie
Universität zu Köln
Conception of space and reception of antiquity in Abdelaziz Ferrah's novel Moi, Saint Augustin

  • Prof. Bettenworth is Professor of Latin at the University of Cologne. She specializes in Roman Elegy, Greek-Roman Epic, Curtius Rufus, andthe Reception of the Antiquity, especially in modern Maghreb. Her current project examines the reception of antiquity in modern literature and film of the Maghreb. The focus is on the role that ancient figures play in the post-colonial societies of North Africa, especially for the Berber population.

Dr. Ridha Moumni
Tunisia Postdoctoral Fellow
THE CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES | HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Ottoman Carthage: the reception of antiquities by Tunisian ruling class (19th cent.)

  • Dr. Ridha Moumni is currently an Aga Khan Fellow at the Department of Art History of Harvard University. He is conducting research at Harvard’s Center of Middle Eastern Studies on the collection of Muhammad Khaznadar, the first Tunisian dignitary to excavate the ancient site of Carthage. A second project explores the role of the arts in nation building in Postcolonial Tunisia. Dr Moumni recently published a book on Tunisian visual artists from the 19th century to the Revolution. He is currently at work on a book project on the collections of Bardo National Museum.

Prof. Nisrine Slitine El Mghari
Assistant Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies, and French and Francophone Studies | ​Modern and Classical Languages Literatures and Cultures | University of Kentucky
The Moroccan Imperial City of Fez : A Quest for Collective Memory

  • Professor Slitine El Mghari's research focuses on representations of the city in 20th- and 21st-century Francophone and Arabophone Moroccan literature. More specifically, her work concerns itself with the different social, historical, and political forces that contribute to the construction of urban spaces, and draws on various critical and theoretical fields, including colonial and postcolonial studies, cultural memory studies, gender studies, and literary studies, while at the same time considering different contemporary Moroccan urban structures from a spatio-temporal perspective. Currently, she explores forms of popular culture, ranging from grafitti, the graphic novel, to new-age journalism, as well as texts written in dārija (the Moroccan dialect). Her interest in cinema studies includes more contemporary genres like the various web series produced by young North African artists and examining social, cultural, and political realities. Her research areas are also in Maghrebi Francophone and Arabophone literature and civilization, Sub-Saharan Francophone fiction, and French Antillian literature and culture. 

Prof. Paolo Visonà Associate Professor Adjunct | School of Art and Visual Studies | University of Kentucky

Ancient Coins in Motion: Numismatic Finds in Tunisia from the 16th to the Early 20th Centuries

  • Paolo Visonà is a classical archaeologist who has been the principal investigator on several long-term excavation projects in Italy that were supported by the Mamertion Foundation, and later by the Foundation for Calabrian Archaeology.  His publications include studies in archaeology, art history and numismatics.  At the University of Kentucky, he has taught classes on classical mythology, Greek and Roman art, and a seminar on ancient coins.
Date: 
Friday, March 6, 2020 - 5:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
Jacobs Science Building 321
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Wrathful Goddess or Tutelary Deity? Juno and Roman Imperialism: Bluegrass Classics Lecture IV

Lisa Mignone is the author of The Republican Aventine and Rome's Social Order (University of Michigan Press, 2016).  She was the inaugural Guangqi Lecturer at Shanghai Normal University in China (2016), and she has won several other international fellowships, including a Rome Prize at the American Academy in Rome (2006-2007) and the Margot Tytus Visiting Scholarship, which she currently holds.  She has written articles on urban social integration, religious topography, and classical reception, and she was an editor of Studi e Scavi sull’Aventino 2003-2015 (Quasar Edizioni). Her second monograph, Rome's Juno: religious imperialism and self-preservation is under contract with University of Michigan Press.

Wrath.  Hatred.  Brutality.  Is there more to the goddess Juno than the constantly cuckolded wife of Olympian Jupiter, the goddess ever-hateful of Aeneas' destiny to reach Italian shores and found Rome?  This paper positions both the goddess Juno and her worship outside of literary conventions, where she consistently appears as a foreign or external goddess in constant need of appeasement, inveiglement, and reconciliation.  When we look beyond (or around) the literary character to examine the object of active veneration, Juno emerges as the goddess to whom Romans turn at times of extraordinary military crisis--and she is the deity who responds. She not only protects the Roman state, but also extends its imperial jurisdiction.  This paper examines the role of the foremost goddess in Roman religious culture and practice during the Republic, particularly with respect to issues of Roman manhood and imperialism. Arguments draw from historical, religious, archaeological, epigraphic, numismatic, art historical and literary evidence from Rome, Etruscan Veii, Latin Lanuvium, and Punic Carthage. This work contributes to the study of ancient imperialism, Mediterranean religions, and inter-cultural history. Furthermore, it provides the cultural and historical context in which we can more fully recognize and appreciate the divide between and intersections across poetic creation and performed religious experience. While the initial goal of the project may have been to cleave religious, military, and political history from the contaminating influence of poetic constructions, ultimately the project deepens and enriches our understanding of both Roman religious-military practices and the construction of Juno as a literary character.

Date: 
Friday, March 22, 2019 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Lexmark Room

The Egyptian Homer in Heliodorus' An Ethiopian Tale: Symbols, Thighs, and Questions of Identity.

Date: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
Cowgill 102, Transylvania University
Type of Event (for grouping events):

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UK faculty members, Ross Scaife and Raphael Finkel, contributed to the English translation of the Suda lexicon, a massive 10th century Byzantine encyclopedia.

Languages and the Arts: The Perfect Love Story

The relationship has never been made official, but everyone knows that Languages and the Arts are an item. As the story goes, the two got together sometime around the fall of Babel, and they’ve been inseparable ever since.

Celebrate A&S: 2012 Hall of Fame Inductee Louis J. Swift

Lou Swift graduated from Johns Hopkins in 1963 and joined UK’s faculty as the chair of the newly reformed Department of Classics in 1970. His research interests focus on the study of early Christianity, including the issue of war and peace in late antiquity, and the relationship between religion and politics in America. Though he officially retired in 2001, he continues to teach an undergraduate course on the connection between religion and politics in America.

In addition to his teaching duties at UK, Swift also served as the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs from 1996-1998, the Dean of Undergraduate Studies from 1990-1999, and the Director of the University Studies Program from 1986-1999. He was also recognized by the National Academic Advisors Association in 1997 with the Pace Setter Award. During his tenure at UK, he was instrumental in forming the Central Advising Office, the Undergraduate Research Program, and the Preparing Future Faculty Program.

UK Latin Seminar, Internationally Recognized and Celebrated

This past summer marked the 16th anniversary of one of the world's most unique events held on UK's campus.

UK Graduate Awarded Prestigious Fellowship in Germany

UK graduate Casey Carmichael, who earned his master's degree from the Department of Classics in 2010, was recently awarded a six-month doctoral fellowship from the Leibniz Institute for European History in Mainz, Germany.

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