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More Than 5,000 Sign Up for UKs Free Online Chemistry Prep Course

The "Advanced Chemistry" course, beginning Jan. 27, will be the university's first to use Coursera, a leading platform for MOOCs (massive open online courses). The non-credit course is designed to prepare incoming and current students for college-level chemistry classes, and to provide supplemental material for students already enrolled in chemistry classes for credit.

Film as Art - The Agreeable and the Beautiful: Stefan Bird-Pollan

This fall, University of Kentucky Philosophy Professor Stefan Bird-Pollan will be leading a class that hopes to expand the ways in which students interact with film. In the course, PHI 300: The Philosophy of Film, students will examine the aesthetics of film from the early 20th century through the 1970s. Through this aesthetic exploration, Bird-Pollan hopes to expose the ways in which our relationships with films directly impact the way we relate to the rest of the world around us. 
 
In this podcast, Bird-Pollan discusses how the class will address a broad range of films both domestic and foreign; the processes of film creation that shape our interaction with them; and how he hopes to use the class to move past the "I like it or don't" binary. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Making America New: Patricia Ehrkamp

For the first time in over a decade, Congress is considering legislation that would drastically reform immigration in America. The issue, however, is highly contentious with any number of interests hoping to shift the bill one way or another. Even once all of the debates are said and done, it's still not clear whether or not such legislation will actually become the law of the land guiding America's relationship with immigration in the future. 

If you're curious as to why immigration is such a contentious yet crucial issue, then perhaps Geography professor Patricia Ehrkamp's course this fall, "Geography 221 - Immigrant America," is for you. 
 
In this podcast, Professor Ehrkamp discusses how her class will guide students through an examination of immigration's storied legacy in America while also exploring the ways in which immigrants are still reshaping the country to this day. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Literary Encounters with Vampires: Michael Carter

Since long before the most recent glitzy boom, vampires have been haunting our imaginations and our literature. In a new course being offered this fall, English 130: Literary Encounters - Vampiresthe English department's Michael Carter will introduce students to the storied mythology of vampires whose written history dates back to over a century before Bram Stoker's iconic Dracula.
 
In this podcast, Carter discusses the origins of what we call vampires today; what students can expect in the class through its examination of literature, film, and television; and some of the reasons why Vampires have achieved such eternal cultural relevance including unlikely connections to economics. 

 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Art of Argument and Bullshit: Jenny Rice

This fall, University of Kentucky WRD Professor Jenny Rice will be leading the course UKC 381: Argumentation - “Deliberation, Persuasion, and Bullshit in the Public Sphere." While the title of the course may seem provocative, the topic is serious. In the class, students can expect to examine the tactics and strategies used to argue key issues in the public sphere and what the legacy of those arguments have left us with today.

In this podcast, Professor Rice discusses the role of argumentation in our lives daily as well as what philosopher Harry Frankfurt infamously labeled “bullshit" and its impact on conversations both local and national. 

 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Meaning of Life: Will Gervais

During the 2013 fall semester, University of Kentucky students will have the opportunity to delve into questions that explore some of society's most deeply held beliefs. The ambitiously titled class, "A&S 300: The Meaning of Life - Psychology, Evolution, Religion, and Morality," will be led by Psychology Professor Will Gervais who has focused his research around this very topic.

In the class, students can expect to investigate the psychological and evolutionary underpinnings of religious and moral beliefs through studies of cognitive and evolutionary science. Gervais hopes to use this lens to encourage students to not ask questions around whether or not a higher power exists, but instead question why people believe what they do and the implications of that on society.
 
In this podcast, Gervais touches on these issues and how now more than ever, it's important that we use the tools of science to examine the roles of religion and morality.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Foundations of Peace: Clayton Thyne

This fall, Political Science Professor Clayton Thyne will be teaching A&S 100: Introduction to Peace Studies. The class will serve as a portal into the wide range of theories exploring the nature and causes of conflict, the possibilities for conflict resolution, and the foundations of peace.

Paired with this course is a new interdisciplinary certificate in Peace Studies from the College of Arts and Sciences. As a part of the new certificate, students interested in expanding their understanding of issues of peace and justice at both local and global levels will be able to take a series of courses specific to the certificate as well as courses in their own fields of study that intersect with discussions of peace.
 
In this podcast, Professor Thyne discusses his class, the field of Peace Studies itself, and the advantages that the new certificate program affords University of Kentucky students. 
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Art and Epidemics: UKC 310 with Rita Basuray and Katherine Rogers-Carpenter

Creative expression and disease aren't two topics that are often juxtaposed, but UKC 310: Art and Epidemics, will explore five diseases from a creative and technical angle: tuberculosis, AIDS, cancer, alcoholism, and the plague - through a variety of creative lenses, including film, short fiction, poetry, and art. Rita Basuray and Katherine Rogers-Carpenter will co-teach the fall 2013 course, looking at the parallels between scientific and creative writing, and where these forms diverge. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Knowledge and Reality: Philosophy 100 with Amanda Lusky

Philosophy 100 satisfies a UK Core requirement in Intellectual Inquiry in the Humanities - and Amanda Lusky describes what it entails. Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality explains metaphysics and epistemology, two central tenets of philosophy, and strives to connect the ways that fields of knowledge intersect and overlap.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Science Behind What We Drink: Rita Basuray

The fluids we drink can hold cultural and historical significance -- but what about the way they affect our physiology? A new course, A&S 100-024, The Science Behind What We Drink, is professor Rita Basuray’s fusion of the two. By examining the role of water, beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola in terms of historical significance and the ways in which they interact with the human body, the class will connect science and the humanities. Basuray’s class is also bridging the gap between campus and community by bringing in local businesses such as Mon Tea and campus organizations like the UK office of Substance Education & Responsibility to the course. 

For more information about the course, contact Rita Basuray: rita.basuray@uky.edu. To enroll, please contact your academic advisor.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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