carbon

Bio-inspired Materials for Carbon Capture and Self-Improvement

Nature uses microvascular structures as a central element of complex materials that grow, regenerate, and improve themselves and their function. Work into synthesizing microvascular materials has recently taken a step forward in the form of a new synthetic process VaSC (Vaporization of a Sacrificial Component) that enables the formation of 3D microstructures that are meters in length. I report on our recent advances in using VaSC to create three-dimensional gas exchange units modeled on the design of avian lungs. I will focus on mass transfer applications for the capture of CO2. I will also report on recent research into creating high surface area micro-structures, the synthesis of cooperative binders of CO2 and chemical reactions mediated by photo-thermal effects. Finally, I will talk about adapting microvascular structure to allow them to improve their functions through chemical remodeling.

Link to Esser-Kahn group: link

Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
CP-114B
Tags/Keywords:

UK's John Anthony Talks Organic Solar Cells and Transistors

John Anthony, the John C. Hubbard Professor of Chemistry, is a pioneer in organic materials—things that are made from carbon instead of silicon. With grants from the U.S. Navy, NSF, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, as well a number of industrial sponsors, Anthony’s research focuses on organic solar cells (for low-cost generation of electricity), organic thin-film transistors (for flexible flat-panel displays), and organic light-emitting diodes (for high-efficiency lighting).

Co-founded by Anthony and CEO John Beran in 2005 and based in Louisville, Anthony’s company Outrider Technologies develops organic semiconductors for the electronics industry. The company has licenses with global technology giant 3M, and Outrider has paid UK nearly $850,000 in royalties since 2007 from license agreements for compounds developed by Anthony. He explains, "We’ve been able to put transistors, integrated circuits, on saran wrap. We actually just submitted this for publication to one of the Nature journals. So we know we can do the basic circuitry and that it’s stable, it doesn’t die when you crumple it up and fold it up and stuff it in your pocket. The next question is, can we get the performance out of it? That is where a good-sized effort of my research group is now turning its attention."

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

Subscribe to RSS - carbon
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading