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Bio-inspired Materials for Carbon Capture and Self-Improvement

Nature uses microvascular structures as a central element of complex materials that grow, regenerate, and improve themselves and their function. Work into synthesizing microvascular materials has recently taken a step forward in the form of a new synthetic process VaSC (Vaporization of a Sacrificial Component) that enables the formation of 3D microstructures that are meters in length. I report on our recent advances in using VaSC to create three-dimensional gas exchange units modeled on the design of avian lungs. I will focus on mass transfer applications for the capture of CO2. I will also report on recent research into creating high surface area micro-structures, the synthesis of cooperative binders of CO2 and chemical reactions mediated by photo-thermal effects. Finally, I will talk about adapting microvascular structure to allow them to improve their functions through chemical remodeling.

Link to Esser-Kahn group: link

Date:
-
Location:
CP-114B
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UK's John Anthony Talks Organic Solar Cells and Transistors

John Anthony, the John C. Hubbard Professor of Chemistry, is a pioneer in organic materials—things that are made from carbon instead of silicon. With grants from the U.S. Navy, NSF, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, as well a number of industrial sponsors, Anthony’s research focuses on organic solar cells (for low-cost generation of electricity), organic thin-film transistors (for flexible flat-panel displays), and organic light-emitting diodes (for high-efficiency lighting).

Anonymous (not verified) Wed, 10/17/2012 - 11:59 am
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