Cancer

Glazer research group's work highlighted on the back cover of the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry

A research study performed by Dr. Dmytro Havrylyuk, Dr. David Heidary, Leona Nease, Dr. Sean Parkin, and Dr. Edith Glazer was profiled on the back cover of the journal The European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry for a special cluster issue titled "Metal Anticancer Complexes – Activity, Mechanism of Action and Future Perspectives". 

Glazer Research Group's work highlighted on the cover of ACS Combinatorial Science

A publication authored by Dr. Erin Wachter, Mr. Diego Moya, and Prof. Edith Glazer was profiled on the cover of ACS Combinatorial Science. 

Could the Next New Cancer Drug Come from Kentucky Coal Mines?

In their ongoing quest to develop the latest and most effective drugs for disease treatment, researchers in the University of Kentucky's Center for Pharmaceutical Research and Innovation are looking deep — as in, deep underground.

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/

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