biology

UK Faculty Member Wins Statewide Teaching Award

University of Kentucky Biology professor Robin Cooper recently won an award from the Kentucky Academy of Science (KAS), commending his excellence in teaching.

Standout from the Crowd: Jin-Young Kim

Jin-Young Kim is a student at the University of Kentucky's College of Dentistry but her path there was paved as an Arts and Sciences undergraduate majoring in biology. Kim's experiences visiting the dentist as a child instilled in her the desire to give other people the confidence to let their pearly whites shine. Similarly, the goal of UK and the College of Arts and Sciences is to instill in its students the confidence they need to let their best selves show.

Kim found that her biology major allowed her to meet all of the pre-dental requirements as well as secure a strong grasp on the sciences that would be crucial to her field of work. Further, as an undergraduate in the College of Arts and Sciences, she found many student and pre-professional organizations that helped provide her with the experience necessary to help her standout from the crowd during dentistry school interviews. 

Guiding Kim through all of this—her undergraduate degree and dental school preparations—was her A&S advisor who became, overtime, not just an advisor but a friend.

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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Suburban Ecology and Invasive Species Research Experience at UK

Through a National Science Foundation program called Research Experiences for Undergraduates, 10 students from colleges across the country spent 10 weeks studying suburban ecology and invasive species at or nearby UK's Ecological Research Facility.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

 

 

Charting A Unique Course: Pooja Patil

For undergraduates on the path to becoming doctors, UK’s B.S./M.D. program accelerates the student’s educational path allowing them to earn a medical degree in only seven years. One dimension of this track, is a degree in biology from the College of Arts and Sciences. By combining a student's undergraduate and graduate degree into one program, the University of Kentucky is better able to serve those students who already have their collegiate goals mapped out.

One of those students is A&S Ambassador Pooja Patil. She found the accelerated program a perfect fit for her aspirations but in our interview Patil also places an emphasis on the non-medical aspect of her education. As a piano performance minor, Patil has found this musical outlet an important part of her education and the requisite practice breaks a welcome relief from all of the science. Her advice for students on a similar path as her own was also drawn from this experience. Patil suggests that while it's important to take all of the science course you can, it's also important that students take advantage of A&S's broad offerings to further their education in other areas such as music or writing.

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Bishop to Lead Lecture in Research Ethics Lecture Series

The University of Kentucky Department of Philosophy and the UK Program for Bioethics will present the latest component in the Research Ethics Lecture Series Wednesday, Oct. 10.

A Bedrock Education

For many University of Kentucky students, the right undergraduate degree is an important stepping stone towards a life-long goal of pursuing medicine, dentistry, or law. The College of Arts and Sciences works hard to develop programs and majors that help cater to the pre-professional goals of its many students.

Biology Grant Will Focus on Fish, Possible Key to Human Retinal Regeneration

Biology Professor Ann Morris' lab contains approximately 200 individual fish tanks, but only one type of fish.

Biology Grant Will Focus on Fish, Possible Key to Human Retinal Regeneration

 

 

Biology Professor Ann Morris' lab contains approximately 200 individual fish tanks, but only one type of fish. Having recently secured a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Morris will continue investigating zebrafish and the insight they offer in regard to solutions for human retinal degeneration. The NIH grant, titled, “The role of insm1 in vertebrate photoreceptor differentiation,” will be funded over five years and focuses on zebrafish to better understand genetic pathways that control the development of the retina. "Mammals cannot regenerate photoreceptors, because the retina is part of the central nervous system, and like other neurons in the brain, when you damage them you can't replace them," Morris said. "So that means when people get genetic diseases where the neurons, particularly the photoreceptors, start to die or to degenerate, there's no way of replacing those cells, so eventually they go blind. While that's true for mammals, it's not true for fish. Fish can regenerate photoreceptors." Morris' study focuses on both the development of the retina and photoreceptor regeneration in fish, as she hopes to gain insight that could eventually be applied to the development of cell-based therapies for human retinal regeneration.

Video courtesy of University of Kentucky Public Relations. uknow.uky.edu/multimedia/video

 

 

A Bedrock Education: Ariel Blythe Reske

For many University of Kentucky students, the right undergraduate degree is an important stepping stone towards a life-long goal of pursuing medicine, dentistry, or law. The College of Arts and Sciences works hard to develop programs and majors that help cater to the pre-professional goals of its many students.

Ariel Blythe Reske is a Biology major and a member of the A&S Student Ambassador program; for her, the desire to become a doctor is one of the primary motivating forces in her education. As an undergraduate in the college of A&S studying Biology, Reske found both classes and professors that challenged, inspired, and changed the way she thought about the world. On top of that, she is better prepared for whatever the future may throw her way.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Evolution of Teaching Excellence - James Krupa

Biology professor James Krupa recently received his second major accolade from the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) in the past two years.
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