News

4/12/2017

By Kathy Johnson and Terry Sebastian

 

A University of Kentucky sociology class won the #VoiceofJustice video contest, as announced via Facebook Live yesterday by Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear and Eileen Recktenwald, director of the Kentucky Association of Sexual Assault Programs (KASAP).

The competition called upon college students to submit 30-second videos to promote the free and confidential Sexual Assault Hotline, 800-656-HOPE, and to increase awareness of sexual assault and active bystanding to help prevent it.

A panel of survivors and victim advocates selected the video “Stand with us” as the overall $500 video prizewinner. Students enrolled in Emily Bonistall

4/10/2017

By Dominique Page

This week, the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW) will present the fourth lecture of their series "Researching Violence: Challenges, Strategies, and Practices."

Claire Renzetti, professor and chair of the UK Department of Sociology, and the Judy Conway Patton Endowed Chair for CRVAW, will deliver the lecture titled "Benefits and Challenges of Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk for Studying Violence Against Women" at noon, Wednesday, April 12, in Room 115 of the UK College of Nursing.

The endowed faculty at the center are presenting topics over the next several years regarding the challenges of measuring violence against women and potential strategies for conducting this research. The focus is on conceptual and

4/10/2017

By Gail Hairston

The fourth event for the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Civic Life seminar series will be moderated by Molly Thomasy Blasing, assistant professor of Russian studies in the college’s Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC). The event will be noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

This week’s topic is “Russia and the World in 2017."

A panel discussion will be moderated by Blasing with: Gregory Hall (Patterson School); Karen Petrone (History); Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby (MCLLC);

4/9/2017

A research study performed by Dr. Dmytro Havrylyuk, Dr. David Heidary, Leona Nease, Dr. Sean Parkin, and Dr. Edith Glazer was profiled on the back cover of the journal The European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry for a special cluster issue titled "Metal Anticancer Complexes – Activity, Mechanism of Action and Future Perspectives". 

From the description of the cover art: "This cover feature shows a selection of inorganic elements that are used in new anticancer agents described in this cluster issue. The hourglass symbolizes the time-sensitive nature of chemotherapy treatment as well as the spatial and temporal control achieved with light-activated compounds. The strained complex on the left can eject a ligand to form covalent adducts with DNA, while the unstrained complex on the right generates ROS. In both cases pyridylbenzazole ligands (X = CH, NH, O, S) were

4/7/2017
By Gail Hairston Throughout Andrew Byrd’s successful career in academia, he has pushed to understand ancient languages to a depth no one has before. His goal was to understand how languages spoken thousands of years ago actually sounded.   That scholarly obsession has led Byrd, an assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Kentucky, to places and experiences he never imagined. He just completed creating ancient languages for National Geographic Channel’s new series “Origins: The Journey of Humankind.”   The global notoriety began in 2013 when Byrd’s work caught the attention of the Archaeological Institute of America’s Archaeology magazine. The magazine published an online piece that included recordings of Byrd reading two fables he had constructed in the prehistoric language known as Proto-Indo-European (PIE). It wasn’t long before he was featured in several
4/7/2017
By Whitney Harder   Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.   Kirk is editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel for the 2016-17 academic year and was chosen for her pursuit of open records from UK. In January, a judge ruled in favor of UK's position in the case involving the privacy of victim survivors of sexual misconduct. The Kernel is appealing.   Kirk, along with nine other winners, is profiled in the May issue of Glamour. The story is available online at www.glamour.com/story/2017-college-women-of-the-year-winners.     All winners receive a cash prize, a trip to New York City, introductions to top professionals in a variety of fields, national recognition in the magazine, and hair
4/7/2017
By Loretta Stafford A team of University of Kentucky undergraduates has advanced to the semifinals of "Heroes of the Dorm," an international video gaming tournament centered around the popular online game "Heroes of the Storm."   The team, aptly named "Scratch Em," will go head-to-head with Louisiana State University's team at the Heroic Four competition this Saturday, April 8, at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.   Heroes of the Dorm is a free-entry tournament open to college students in the United States and Canada. Eligible teams consist of five to six participants who attend the same school. Over 200 teams registered to compete in this year's tournament, each vying for an opportunity at the grand prize — a three-year, full tuition scholarship.   The members of UK’s “Scratch Em” are two sets of three brothers: freshman biology major Daniel Pina; sophomore
4/6/2017
By Connie Sapienza   Front row (l to r): Alyssa Mertka, Meg Coppala, Hadeel Abdallah and Susie Smith. Middle row (l to r): Meghana Kudrimoti and Michael Regard. Back row (l to r); Beau Revlett, Ben Jones, Eric Poore and Nate Cortas. Not pictured: Sophia Decker and Amaris Wade   The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has selected 12 exceptional undergraduates as new scholars for the university's Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 academic years. Gaines Fellowships are given in recognition of outstanding academic performance, demonstrated ability to conduct independent research, an interest in public issues, and a desire to enhance understanding of the human condition through the humanities.   Gaines Fellowships are awarded for the tenure of a student's junior and senior years, or for the last two years of a five-year program;
4/6/2017
By Loretta Stafford University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) is partnering with the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures in the UK College of Arts and Sciences to welcome University of Oregon Professor Stephen Durrant as the next speaker of the 2017 Distinguished Scholars Series. Durrant's lecture examining historiography in Chinese, Greek and Hebrew society will take place from 3:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 11, at the Alumni Gallery located in the William T. Young Library. The lecture is free and open to the public.   Stephen Durrant's lecture, "What Does It Mean to Write History? Perspectives From Ancient China, Greece and Israel," focuses on the earliest historical texts of each civilization, and investigates how those writings shape what follows. While there are many similarities between these traditions of historiography, the
4/6/2017
  Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.    By Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser   Noor Alattar, an English doctoral student from Iraq, will never forget the words of encouragement her professor, Michelle Sizemore, shared with her when she first arrived at the University of Kentucky.    "Everything was new to me," Alattar said. "She would never just encourage you with empty words. She was more than welcoming."   In fact, that encouragement is why Alattar nominated Sizemore to win a 2017 Great Teacher Award. Watch why this English professor's words were so meaningful to Alattar by clicking on the video above.      Sizemore
4/6/2017
By Gail Hairston   Karen Kelsky, the successful founder and president of The Professor Is In, an academic-career consulting business, visits the University of Kentucky campus April 7.   Kelsky will have a busy schedule on Friday, mentoring graduate students, post-doctoral students, faculty and staff in preparing for successful careers both inside and outside academia. Her visit is part of the annual "Life After Grad School" series, organized by the Graduate Student Congress.    Once a tenured anthropology professor at the University of Oregon and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, she now runs her successful advising business, but is also a frequent columnist as well as a frequent source for other writer’s articles in The Chronicle of Higher Education. She is the author of “The Professor Is In: The Essential Guide to Turning Your Ph.D. into a Job.” For more
4/4/2017
By Jennifer Allen and Gail Hairston   Karen Petrone in the Department of History is the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences’ 2017-18 A&S Distinguished Professor.   “Since joining the faculty of the college in 1994, Petrone has established a record of outstanding teaching, scholarship and service that is recognized by her colleagues both here at UK and in the discipline of history,” said Mark Lawrence Kornbluh, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.   In 1998, within four years of her arrival at UK, Petrone was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Teaching. She has taught a wide variety of courses ranging from freshman survey offerings in European history to advanced graduate seminars in Russian history. She was very active in the college’s former Gender and Women’s Studies Program (now department) and was a leader in developing UK’s Working
4/4/2017
By Gail Hairston   The third event for the College of Arts and Sciences Civic Life seminar series will be hosted by Professor of Sociology Carlos de la Torre and Professor of History Tracy Campbell. The event will be noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 5, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library. It is free and open to the public.   This week’s topic is “Populist Moments and the Future of Democracy Under Trump."   Donald Trump’s presidency is bringing American populism from the margins to the center of power. He uses populist rhetoric and strategies to confront “the establishment,” promising to end the neoliberal multicultural consensus that linked globalization and the cultural recognition of different identity groups such as women, Muslims, African Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans and the LGBTQ communities.   The Oxford English Dictionary defines
4/3/2017
By Connie Sapienza   Later this month, the University of Kentucky will host "Expanding Your Horizons (EYH)," a conference that encourages middle school girls to consider studies in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). Registration for the conference is currently open, and UK is also seeking student and postdoctoral volunteers to assist.   EYH, which will be held Saturday, April 29, in the Jacobs Science Building, seeks to provide middle school girls and their parents an inspiring environment in order to help both groups recognize and pursue opportunities in STEM. This will include memorable interactive workshop experiences, visible female role models in STEM fields and exposure to different career paths in STEM.   Course credit is available for UK undergraduate and graduate students interested in designing and leading workshops for the middle schoolers.
4/3/2017
By Gail Hairston   This spring’s Anthropology Colloquium/Inclusive Excellence Decolonizing the Academy Lecture is “Yo Amo Mi Pajón: Afro-Dominicanness and the Natural Hair Movement in the Dominican Republic and Beyond” presented by Kimberly Eison Simmons, associate professor of anthropology and African American studies and associate dean of the South Carolina Honors College at the University of South Carolina.   Simmons will speak at 5 p.m. today (Monday), April 3, in Room 118 White Hall Classroom Building on the University of Kentucky campus.   A reserved luncheon is slated with Simmons as the special guest with UK faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate students from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, in the Alumni Gallery of the William T. Young Library.   Immediately after Simmons’ lecture, there will be a dinner reception in the lobby just outside Room 118 White Hall
3/31/2017

By Gail Hairston

The University of Kentucky will send 59 undergraduate student-researchers to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) at the University of Memphis April 6-8.

The UK group joins young researchers from around the world to showcase their research findings through poster and oral presentations. Each student will be given the opportunity to discuss their display and share their research results, illuminating how their work will have an impact on future research development. UK has been an active NCUR participant since the mid ’90s.

One of the first things these young researchers learn is that most research is not conducted in the traditional laboratory with bubbling beakers and flaming Bunsen burners. But modern research spans all disciplines and majors, and includes a wide variety of activities.

3/31/2017

By Gail Hairston

Drury Bell took the $100 first place prize in the 51st annual Latin Prose Competition Contest and Katerina S. Banks tied for the third place $50 prize.

The Latin Prose Composition Contest consists of the translation of a passage of English into Latin. The contest is intended for advanced students of Latin who are in their third or fourth year of collegiate studies. It is organized by Eta Sigma Phi, the Honorary Society for Classical Studies.

“These outstanding students are bringing national recognition to our program in Classics, MCLLC, A&S, and to UK. I think that this extraordinary achievement merits great attention,” said Valerio Caldesi Valeri, assistant professor of classics and the Eta Sigma Phi advisor in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and

3/30/2017

By Whitney Harder

Paidin Dermody, a University of Kentucky journalism and English sophomore with a minor in photography, has been named the Kentucky Kernel's editor for the 2017-2018 school year.

“I feel lucky — opportunity met preparation, and I now have the great responsibility of following a talented line of editors-in-chief to continue the storied history of the Kernel as one of the pre-eminent student publications in the country,” Dermody said in a Kernel story last week. “Good people and great journalism will deliver an evolved, enlightened and entertaining product to our readers.”

The Kernel Board selected Dermody, currently the managing editor, "for her detailed plan to expand the Kernel’s digital footprint,

3/29/2017

By Lisa Lockman

Two University of Kentucky women who profoundly contribute to issues that affect women at the university and across the Commonwealth received the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award March 23 during a luncheon ceremony at the Woodford Reserve Club at Commonwealth Stadium. Kimberly Sayre, staff, and Christia Spears Brown, faculty, received the 2017 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award.

The award recognizes one female faculty member and one female staff member who promote growth and well-being of women at the university and across Kentucky. Created by the UK Women’s Forum, the Sarah Bennett Holmes Award has been among the most esteemed recognitions bestowed at UK and brings recognition for efforts that might otherwise go unnoticed.

Christia Spears Brown is a professor of developmental and social psychology in the

3/29/2017

By Gail Hairston

An international hero — a friend, ally and cellmate to the great Nelson Mandela in the global fight for equality and justice — has died at 87, and many in the University of Kentucky community grieve with the world. South African anti-apartheid leader Ahmed Kathrada, who dedicated his life to the belief that all men and women are born free and equal, died “peacefully in a Johannesburg hospital after a short period of illness, following surgery,” according to communications from his family.

Kathrada spent more than 26 years in prison‚ 18 on Robben Island. While in prison he earned four university degrees: a bachelor’s in history and criminology‚ one in African politics and library science‚ a bachelor honors degree in history and a second bachelor honors degree in African politics.

Nearly six years

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