News

6/7/2011

by Ann Boden

University of Kentucky graduate, Col. James “Jim” Crider is currently serving as the G3 for the 3rd Infantry Division/Task Force Marne in Northern Iraq. In this, his third tour in Iraq, Col. Crider is planning, resourcing and synchronizing stability operations there. On September 1, 2010 he began primarily training, advising and assisting the Iraqi Security Forces. But his job includes dealing with other issues as well including regional relationships between the Arabs and the Kurds, securing the boarder, providing provincial reconstruction, and protecting American forces.
Currently nearing the end of his third tour, Col. Crider explains that each of his tours has been different. His first tour was with the 1st Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division during the initial invasion.

6/7/2011

by Jason Kazee

Keep moving forward. Words such as these can get you through daily challenges, lifelong struggles, or even just around the next corner. Though these words are not found in the United States Army Code of Conduct, soldiers and civilians alike can rely on them. Cadet Battalion Commander Brennan Parker depends on them to carry him through whatever may lie ahead.
Parker recently took part in a 12-cadet relay that carried the game ball from Joker Phillips’ hands in Commonwealth Stadium and delivered it to a team from the University of Louisville’s ROTC program. The team ran 46-miles to a town located mid-way between Lexington and Louisville, Kentucky. The cadets from the University

6/7/2011

By Kami Rice
photos by Richie Wireman

When he enlisted, Master Sergeant Jason Skinner wasn’t planning on a career in the military. He simply needed money to help pay for the birth of his daughter, and a stint in uniform could provide it. So just out of high school, he made a three-year commitment to the Army. Now 17 years later, he’s still wearing his military fatigues.

“I didn’t come in for a greater good,” Skinner acknowledged. “But after being [in the Army] and falling in love with the people and being part of an organization that’s bigger than yourself, that’s why I stayed.”

In March, Skinner arrived at UK from Fort Riley in Kansas to serve as the senior military instructor with UK’s ROTC “Wildcat Battalion.” In his new role, the 35-year-old Indiana native serves as the right-hand support for 

6/7/2011

UK professor of Political Science Mark Peffley's most recent publication, "Justice in America: The Separate Realities of Blacks and Whites" was awarded the Robert Lane Award from the Political Psychology Section of the American Political Science Association. Available from Cambridge University Press, the book is co-authored by Professor Jon Hurwtiz of the University of Pittsburgh.

Peffley & Hurwitz's research uses innovative survey experiments to uncover how whites and blacks formulate and use their widely differing views of the fairness of the

6/7/2011
camp nelson refugee huts

by Erin Holaday Ziegler

A Kentucky-produced educational film on the state's archaeology did more than just debut on the west coast.

"Historic Archaeology: Beneath Kentucky's Fields and Streets," produced by the Kentucky Archaeological Survey (KAS), the Kentucky Heritage Council (KHC) and Voyageur Media Group, Inc, garnered three awards at the 8th Annual Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival in Eugene, Ore. This program, the third volume in the council's popular “Kentucky Archaeology” series, was made possible with support from the Federal Highway Administration and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

Chosen as one of only 18

6/3/2011

by Erin Holaday Ziegler

 

The University of Kentucky will welcome a Nicholas County native to campus this fall as the university continues its mission to unite and strengthen its Appalachia programming.

Internationally renowned cultural anthropologist Ann Kingsolver has accepted the positions of director of the Appalachian Studies Program and director of the Appalachian Center at UK.

“I am thrilled that Dr. Kingsolver will be joining us in the College of Arts and Sciences and at the university,” said College of Arts and Sciences Dean Mark Lawrence Kornbluh. “Her expertise in Appalachian studies and her lifelong dedication to the region and culture will reverberate well beyond the classroom walls,

6/3/2011

The University of Kentucky will welcome a Nicholas County native to campus this fall as the university continues its mission to unite and strengthen its Appalachia programming.

Internationally renowned cultural anthropologist Ann Kingsolver has accepted the positions of director of the Appalachian Studies Program and director of the Appalachian Center at UK.

“I am thrilled that Dr. Kingsolver will be joining us in the College of Arts and Sciences and at the university,” said 

6/2/2011
Cristina Alcalde is one of the three faculty co-directors for A&S Wired, a new residential college at UK. A&S Wired starts in the Fall of 2011, and aims to integrate the social and intellectual lives of first-year students. She is excited about being involved – and thinks the students will be too. Listen to what she believes this initiative will provide.­    

https://www.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/ASWired_Christina%20Alcalde.mp3

6/2/2011
treadmill desk

by Erin Holaday Ziegler

Kathryn Cunningham is an active person. She is a lifelong vegetarian who consumes a healthy diet 95 percent of the time. She enjoys food, and fitting into her clothes remains a priority.

Cunningham is a wife, mother, student, teacher and consultant to faculty and staff members at the University of Kentucky. She's very much like you and me. And like all of us, she found devoting hours a day to exercise to be challenging.

However, it was a challenge Cunningham was able to overcome in an innovative way.

Innovation plays a daily role in Cunningham's job designing course material as a faculty/instructional consultant at UK's Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT), so the thought of abandoning her desk chair for a treadmill didn't seem like such an outrageous idea.

6/2/2011

by Guy Spriggs

Cassie Hardin was sure that she wanted to explore her passion for studying languages after arriving at the University of Kentucky in the fall of 2008, but she also knew that she getting tired of more traditional romance languages. She wanted something new; she wanted a new horizon.

So how did Hardin arrive at her decision to pursue courses in UK’s Chinese Studies program? She left it up to chance.

“I wanted a new challenge, so I flipped a coin: did I want to do Japanese or did I want to do Chinese. It landed on Chinese, so I went with Chinese and I’m so glad.”

In the spring of 2010, Hardin was presented with a unique opportunity to travel to China for the Conversational Chinese in Shanghai Program through Education Abroad at UK. The program, directed by UK professor Liang Luo, was the inaugural exchange program for the new Confucius

6/2/2011

by Matthew Patton

There’s more than 4,300 miles separating Morehead, KY and Berlin, Germany. For Ben Williams, it was a gap that would be bridged thanks, in part, to his experiences at the University of Kentucky.

Hailing from Morehead, Williams graduated from Rowan County Senior High. From there, he went to the University of Kentucky, followed by a graduate degree from the Elliott School of International Affairs at The George Washington University. His parents still live in Morehead, where his mother works in the Fuzzy Duck Coffee Shop and his father as a professor at Morehead State. His two sisters live in Lexington.

Inspiration

When studying at UK, he was

6/2/2011

by A&S staff
photos by Dana Rogers

A basic connection between the texts of theater and their staging as performance is undeniable. Yet, in most universities today, these disciplines tend to be rigidly divided into separate colleges and departments – literature and languages; the performing arts. In an effort to join together what should have never been separated, Arts & Sciences French professor Suzanne Pucci from the 

6/1/2011
Shannon Elizabeth Bell

The Rural Sociological Society has recognized Shannon Bell and Richard York for Best Article. The article, “Community Economic Identity: The Coal Industry and Ideology Construction in West Virginia,” was published in March 2010 in Rural Sociology, the Society’s journal. Shannon Bell is an assistant professor of sociology at UK; Richard York, who co-authored the article, is a professor at the University of Oregon. 

In their article, Bell and York address the relationship between capitalist modes of production and ecological destruction. Using the Appalachian coal industry as a case study, they demonstrate the ways in which declines in coal industry jobs and the

5/26/2011
Cover of Engineering Earth, edited by Stan Brunn

Stan Brunn, geography professor, author, and editor of various publications has edited the three-volume set “Engineering Earth: The Impacts of Megaengineering Projects.” Springer Publishing released it this year; the whole set contains 126 chapters over 2250 pages. Dick Gilbreath produced many of the figures in the work.
 
There is an introductory chapter by Stan Brunn and Andy Wood; and there is another chapter authored by Brunn. In addition to many well known scholars from across the world, the names of many UK alums appear in the table of contents, including Mark Graham, John Bowen, Ben Smith, Darren Purcell and Jerry Webster. UK students

5/26/2011
tea ceremony

by Whitney Hale, Erin Holaday, & Jessica Hancock

The University of Kentucky Asia Center will host a Chado (Japanese tea ceremony) demonstration at 2 p.m. on May 29 and June 12 at the Art Museum at UK.

The tea ceremony is designed to take a few moments to close out the world and find a moment of peace and tranquility. Chado, meaning "the way of tea," is a way to self-discipline, inner strength and peace. The ceremony is designed to contain different elements of the Japanese arts, including pottery, calligraphy, lacquer work and more.

"In my own hands I hold a bowl of tea; I see all of nature represented in its green color. Closing my eyes I find green mountains and pure water within my own heart. Silently sitting alone and drinking tea, I feel these become a part of me," was the way that Sen

5/25/2011
Monica Harris (Kern)

by Brad Duncan and Jenny Wells

Celebrating its 13th year, the University of Kentucky College of Education’s Teachers Who Made a Difference program honored its newest group of educators at the 2011 ceremony held Saturday, April 30. More than 140 educators from nine states were recognized for the significant influence they have had in the lives of their students.

"The University of Kentucky College of Education prides itself on preparing great teachers," said Mary Ann Vimont, the college's director of Public Relations and Student, Alumni and Community Affairs. "As part of our mission, we also think it is important to honor those teachers who are making a difference in the lives of their students, here in Kentucky and across the country."

The program got its start

5/25/2011
Two archaeologists in a lab.

by Erin Holaday Ziegler and Jessica Hancock

A 2009 film exploring the history that lies beneath Kentuckians' feet is one of 18 films to be featured in this year's Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival in Eugene, Ore.

"Historic Archaeology: Beneath Kentucky's Fields and Streets," produced by the Kentucky Archaeological Survey (KAS), the Kentucky Heritage Council (KHC) and Voyageur Media Group, Inc., will make its west coast debut on Saturday, May 28.

The festival began May 24 and includes five days of juried films and videos on archaeological and indigenous topics as well as a conference on Cultural Heritage Films.

"This is a great honor for KAS and Kentucky archaeology in general," said KAS

5/25/2011

 

There is a wonderful program at Appalshop in Whitesburg, KY called the Appalachian Media Institute that I am excited to have the opportunity to work for this summer.  Appalshop was founded in 1969 as a non-profit multi-media arts and cultural organization dedicated to preserving Appalachian culture as well as addressing the issues that the Appalachian region is confronted with.  They have a community radio station that broadcasts throughout the area as well as internationally streaming on the web.  They have also produced numerous films, some of which were played at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City last fall. 

Check out all that Appalshop has to offer here: 

5/24/2011
United Nations Logo

Christie Shrestha, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology, was contacted by the United Nations' High Committee on Refugees to publish an abridged version of her MA thesis, which was published in 2010. Her thesis, "Power and politics in resettlement: a case study of Bhutanese refugees in the USA," is based on research conducted in 2009 in Lexington, Kentucky. 

The article, as it appears in the UNHCR series, "New Issues in Refugee Research," can be found here.

5/24/2011
Excavations at Eastern State Hospital

by Erin Holaday Ziegler

A former chemistry student digs with small tools, the size of those a dentist might use, next to an aspiring business titan from another life, who lightly brushes away dirt clods with almost maternal care.

"Sometimes I'll be working, and three or four hours will fly by," the former business student says. "It's absorbing."

Both are part of a team working to record and analyze the remains of over 125 patients buried on the historic grounds of Eastern State Hospital, the second-oldest psychiatric hospital in the United States. 

David Pollack, director of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey (KAS) and adjunct  professor of anthropology at the University of Kentucky, has brought together professional archaeologists and anthropology graduate and undergraduate students for the project.  

Pollack and his team of 10 braved cold

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