News

11/21/2014

By Guy Spriggs   UK’s Department of Hispanic Studies has added two new faculty members – Mónica Díaz and Matt Losada – to the ranks of its respected instructors and researchers. Díaz and Losada each bring a wealth of publications and teaching experience, as well as interest in Interdisciplinarity, to the department.   Díaz earned a dual doctorate in Latin American history and Hispanic literature from Indiana University Bloomington. She also received a master’s in Latin American Studies, and this combination of interests continues to propel Díaz’s cultural studies-based approach to research.   “I was always interested in indigenous peoples, in working with native cultural production and also women’s
STEMCats undergraduate instructional assistants.

(Nov. 20, 2014) — As University of Kentucky freshmen settle into life as college students, a new resource on campus has been helping them adjust to STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) programs, known for difficult coursework. Undergraduate instructional assistants (UIAs) within one of the university's newest Living Learning ProgramsSTEMCats, use their past experiences to mentor incoming UK students.

The College of Arts and Sciences recently produced a podcast about the STEMCats community, featuring many STEMCats UIAs explaining what they enjoy about the program and their connections with younger STEM students.

"You get to help them succeed

11/20/2014

Carol Jordan, right, with students

by Gail Hairston

(Nov. 20, 2014) — The reason a female student might not return to her university after her freshman year:

   A) Finances

   B) Grades

   C) Rape

Too many times ‒ more frequently than we have truly understood ‒ the answer is “C.”

The results of a study done among female freshmen at the University of Kentucky in 2011 linking sexual assault and poor academic performance are “direct and compelling,” wrote its authors, Carol Jordan, director of the UK Office for Policy Studies on Violence Against Women; Jessica Combs, a graduate student in clinical psychology; and Gregory Smith, a professor, university research professor, and director of the doctoral program in clinical psychology.

It wasn’t particularly surprising – for UK results mirror numerous national studies -- that the rate of prior sexual assault among women

11/19/2014

Pradyumna (Paul) Karan

 

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing

by Sibel Solagan

(Nov. 19, 2014) — As UK celebrates its sesquicentennial this year, one faculty member in particular has plenty to remember about his history with the university.

 Out of 150 years, I’ve experienced 58 years of UK’s history. Technically, I’m in my 116th semester,” said Pradyumna (Paul) Karan, who is originally from India.    

In August of 1956, Martin M. White, dean of the UK College of Arts and Sciences, hired Karan to teach geography – making Karan one of the first international faculty members in UK's history.

“[Dr. White] couldn’t say my name – that’s when he asked if he could just call me Paul.

By Whitney Harder and Carl Nathe   (Nov. 19, 2014) — Gismo Therapeutics Inc., a New York-based biotech startup, has recently relocated its company to the University of Kentucky Advanced Science and Technology Commercialization Center (ASTeCC), a business incubator housing new and emerging technology-based companies on UK’s campus. The company is a recipient of a 2014 SBIR Matching Funds grant from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.   The Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development and the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership (BBDP) — comprising business development specialists from UK, Commerce Lexington and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government — celebrated Gismo Therapeutics' and three other out-of-state companies' moves to Lexington

11/18/2014

By Rosanna Willhite

The Center for English as a Second Language is pleased to welcome 53 students from Mexico. The students arrived over the weekend of November 9th and will be visiting scholars for one month. The scholars represent not only promising undergraduate students, but also teachers of English and other disciplines in universities in Mexico. They are part of an initiative by the Mexican government called Proyecta 100,000, which aims to send 100,000 students to the United States by 2018.

Please join us as we welcome these visiting scholars by introducing yourself to them at CESL events and partnerships. We hope this will be the beginning of a thriving partnership with Mexico and Proyecta 100,000.

11/17/2014

by Whitney Harder

(Nov. 17, 2014) — The University of Kentucky Appalachian Center will continue its Appalachian Forum with a screening of "Up the Ridge" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18. A discussion will follow with the film's co-producer Amelia Kirby, development director of the Appalachian Citizens Law Center and Melynda Price, director of the African American and Africana Studies Program and College of Law faculty member.

The event will be held in Room 213 of Kastle Hall and is free and open to the public.

"Up the Ridge," an award-

by Kathy Johnson

(Nov. 14, 2014) — WUKY's "UK Perspectives" focuses on the people and programs of the University of Kentucky and is hosted by WUKY General Manager Tom Godell.  Guest host today is WUKY News Director Alan Lytle who welcomes UK alumna and history instructor Maryjean Wall, author of a new book on one of Lexington's most colorful historical characters — Belle Brezing.

To listen to the podcast interview from which "UK Perspectives" is produced, click here.

"UK Perspectives" airs at 8:35 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

11/13/2014

by Mallory Powell

(Nov. 13, 2014) — Jasmine Newman admits that it was a TV show that sparked her interest in cultural anthropology. Growing up in Pikeville, Kentucky, Newman loved watching Bones, a TV series about solving crimes using forensic anthropology. In one episode, the main character mentioned cultural anthropology, a term that Newman didn't know.

"I started researching, and just fell in love with the idea of studying people, studying culture, and using that knowledge to help people relate to each other," she says.

Her passion is evident: Not only is Newman is graduating early with a bachelor's degree in cultural and applied anthropology, she's spent the past two summers interning with community empowerment organizations in South Africa and Appalachia. Both of Newman's internships were facilitated through UK.

"UK has a real drive and reason to work

by Whitney Hale, Mack McCormick

(Nov. 12, 2014) — Now in its 33rd year, the Kentucky Book Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at the Frankfort Convention Center. This year’s fair will feature around 200 authors showcasing their most recent books including several authors from the University of Kentucky and University Press of Kentucky (UPK).

Sponsored by The State Journal, and co-sponsored by the Kentucky Department for Libraries and ArchivesJoseph-Beth Booksellers and UPK

11/10/2014

(Nov. 10, 2014) - The Lexington Herald-Leader took a look at a creative new undertaking that is becoming available at the University of Kentucky - an undergraduate certificate in distillation, wine and brewing studies.

>>Read the full Herald-Leader article

11/07/2014

(Nov. 7, 2014) – Wake up! What if you never had to hear those two words again? A recent online article for Live Science contemplated what life might look like if there were a cure for sleep, and the possible sociological impacts that would follow.

Would you be more productive, healthier, or smarter? Mairead Eastin Moloney, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Kentucky, warned against the idea that a world without sleep would be an improvement, and stressed the importance that sleep has in structuring people’s lives.

>>Read the full Live Science article here

Moloney has done additional research tied to sleep – specifically, on the

11/06/2014

(Nov. 6, 2014) - Professor of Sociology Dwight Billings recently appeared as a guest on BBC World Service Radio to talk about hillbilly stereotypes. Billings says there has always been an interest in the American “other” – an interest that seems to have contrasting parts of fascination and fear.

He also went on to discuss how the stereotypes of people in Appalachia have led to making the area “a sacrifice zone” when it comes to progress in the region.

Listen to the broadcast here: https://soundcloud.com/bbc-world-service/hillbilly-stereotypes

In a career that has spanned over 40 years, Billings has written groundbreaking works on Appalachia, including the book "The Road to Poverty: the Making of Wealth and Hardship in Appalachia," for which he and co-author Kathleen M. Blee received the

11/05/2014

Video by UK Public Relations and Marketing. 

by Gail Hairston, Jenny Wells

(Nov. 4, 2014) — Stephen Voss, associate professor in the Department of Political Science in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, discusses the 2014 Kentucky Senate race in the video above.

"The interest in this Senate campaign has been intense," said Voss, who specializes in elections and voting behavior. "Everyone knew this race was likely to be close. We only have a little time left and still the polls show this thing neck and neck. We won't know who's winning this Senate race until the results come back from the voters."

Listen to Voss' full interview here. 

E-Waste art

by Whitney Hale

(Nov. 4, 2014) — University of Kentucky's College of Arts and Sciences and School of Art and Visual Studies have welcomed Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist Katherine Behar to campus as part of a two-week residency. The public is invited to experience Behar's work as well through "E-Waste," a free public exhibition of new work from the artist presented in conjunction with her visit at UK’s Tuska Center for Contemporary Art, located in the Fine Arts Building. "E-Waste," which runs through Nov. 7, will have an opening reception beginning 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, at Tuska.

"E-Waste" centers on a new series of

Year of the Middle East flags

by Gail Hairston

(Nov. 5, 2014) — “Democracy at Risk Around the World” will be examined at the next University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences’ Year of the Middle East: Crossroads of the World event Nov. 7.

The Quantitative Initiative in Political and Social Research (QIPSR) contributes to The Year of the Middle East calendar with this fifth annual conference, featuring:

Amaney Jamal, political science, Princeton University (co-sponsored by The Year of the Middle East) William Mischler, political science, Arizona University and U.S. Aid for International Development. (Democracy in the former communist countries) Elizabeth Zechmeister, political science,
Christie Vilsack, Senior Advisor for International Education at USAID, with teachers in Kabul, Afghanistan.

(Nov. 4, 2014) -- Christie Vilsack, Senior Advisor for International Education at the U.S. Agency for International Development, will visit the University of Kentucky on Thursday, November 20, as part of UK's International Education Week.

Speaking at 6 p.m. in Memorial Hall, Vilsack will discuss USAID’s education strategy in her presentation titled, "Let Girls Learn: Education in Developing Countries." The event is free and open to the public.

UDAID's education strategy is an initiative focused on improving children’s reading skills, strengthening workforce development and providing fair opportunities for education in areas ridden by conflict. As USAID’s Senior Advisor for International Education, Vilsack travels the world to visit with education leaders, to learn about international programs

By Rosanna Willhite

On October 2, 2014, the Center for English as Second Language, represented by Lina Crocker, partnered with Jan Romond, coordinator of the exhibit, to have an art exhibit in the Student Center at the University of Kentucky. The art exhibit showcased pieces from students of Magoffin High School in Salyersville, KY on storm stories that were a result of a tornado that struck the Salyersville area in March of 2012.

Jan Romond, responsible for orchestrating this event at UK, gave an introduction to the history of the 2012 tornados that had left “widespread destruction in its path.” Two years later, an art teacher from Magoffin High School, Andrea Parsons, is working with the Storm Recovery Ambassadors project to create visual art that offers the opportunity

11/04/2014

By Sarah Schuetze

In a podcast recorded with A&S last year, Assistant Professor of Sociology Shannon Bell described her recent book, Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice, as a project that gives voice to her subjects: women fighting against the environmental effects of coal mining in Appalachia. These women live in regions directly affected by the environmental health costs associated with mountaintop removal coal mining, and they face

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