Spring Courses

To view GWS courses offered during a specific semester, visit the online University Course Catalogue. Select the semester desired from the drop-down menu, then type "GWS" in the Course Prefix box or select GWS from the drop-down menu. Note that actual course offerings are subject to change, but this guide will provide the most current information available.



SPRING 2019 GRADUATE COURSES:  
Please download a PDF copy of our graduate course flier for Spring 2019

GWS 595-001: ISSUES IN GWS: PRACTICUM: WRITING FROM HEART AND MIND
SUSAN BORDO
R 4:00-6:30
In recent years, many scholars have begun to imagine careers that involve contributions to and participation in conversations that extend beyond the academy. Unfortunately, our training rarely prepares us for or provides opportunities to practice the kind of writing (and public speaking) that can communicate to readers/audiences outside our areas of specialization. Too often, as well, we lose our love of writing in the process of becoming “professionalized.” This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates who are interested in recovering their passion for writing and developing the skills and confidence that will enable them to reach an audience beyond the academy. With that goal in mind, we will discuss the obstacles, both personal and institutional, that lie in the way of writing from both heart and mind, we will read and practice genres of writing (e.g. Op-Ed pieces, memoir, “hybrid” pieces) that encourage clarity and creativity, and we will work to create a supportive community for criticism and revision. Students will also develop a more substantial writing project (journal article, dissertation proposal, book proposal, magazine article), individually tailored to their goals. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS major, minor, graduate certificate, and other degrees as appropriate.
 
GWS 600-001: TOPICS IN GWS: PREJUDICE AND INEQUALITY: VIEWS FROM THE SOCIAL SCIENCES
JENNIFER HUNT
R 2:00-4:30
In recent decades, there have been marked improvements in attitudes toward many groups that are stigmatized due to race, gender, sexual orientation, class, and other social identities. Nevertheless, considerable inequalities remain across social groups, subtle forms of discrimination thrive, and, in many cases, prejudice is still openly expressed. This course will attempt to understand this juxtaposition by examining theories of prejudice and inequality from different social science perspectives, including Psychology, Sociology, Gender Studies, Critical Race Theory, and Critical Whiteness Studies. First, we will consider theories on the nature of contemporary prejudice to understand why biases related to race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. persist, how prejudices against different groups are similar and different, and how intersectional oppression occurs. Second, we will consider how pervasive inequality and discrimination affect members of stigmatized groups. We also will examine how members of dominant groups, especially White people, form group-based identities and understand their experiences of privilege. Third, we will analyze different approaches – both good and bad – to reducing prejudice and promoting meaningful rather than rhetorical equality.
 
GWS 650-001: FEMINIST THEORY
KARRIEANN SOTO VEGA
W 3:00-5:30
An interdisciplinary course addressing issues in contemporary feminist theory (such as intersections of race and gender, the body, ideology and representation, sexuality, etc.). This course is required for the GWS graduate certificate and PhD.
 
ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR GWS CREDIT
 
ANT 737-001: GENDER ANTHROPOLOGY
MONICA UDVARDY
T 5:00-7:30
Using both feminist anthropological and interdisciplinary feminist theoretical approaches, the seminar introduces students to the international and cross-cultural variability in gender roles and to the emergence of anthropological approaches to the study of gender. After a brief chronological overview of feminist anthropology since the 1970s, the seminar focuses on recent approaches to a variety of topics, drawing on feminist approaches from both social science and humanities perspectives. The primary objective of this seminar is to provide participants with an overview of some of the salient "schools" that have emerged, and through comparison, critically to assess their limitations and utility for both theoretical and applied objectives in cross-cultural research on gender. This course serves graduate students with interests in international, transnational, cross-cultural, or multicultural perspectives on women and gender. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.
 
EPE 525/773: CAMPUS ACTIVISM AND EDUCATIONAL JUSTICE
KAREN TICE
T 4:00-6:30
This graduate and upper level undergraduate course will consider student movements and dissent across time and space. We will examine a variety of precursor and contemporary student movements that have challenged gendered and racial injustices as well as violence and repression on campus; militarism/imperialism; apartheid; political and religious repression; university investments and budgets; workplace issues; policing; governance and diversity policies; student debt and privatization; LGBTQ rights, etc. We will also consider the struggle to establish resource centers, to expand access, and to develop area and ethnic studies. We will examine student mobilizations such as the 1930’s New Negro Campus Movement, Students for a Democratic Society, and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee aswell as student movements in Mexico, China, and Brazil. We will also probe organizational linkages and legacies for contemporary movements such as Black Lives Matter and analyze various forms of protest including teach-ins, occupations, Die-ins, strikes, and international solidarity work-study brigades. The following questions will guide our discussions: How have students, faculty, and staff helped to remake the university and the state? How have the politics of race, gender, class, sexuality, place/nation, geo-political politics, war, university and state policies, and right-wing conservatism produced or repressed campus protest and discontent? What strategies, ideologies, alliances, and official and state repression/cooptation characterize or accompany student mobilizations? What are the national and transnational connections among student movements? Course readings will include primary historical writings and multidisciplinary readings. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.
 
HIS 563: WOMEN AND GENDER IN LATIN AMERICA
F.R. CHASSEN-LOPEZ
TR 2:00-3:15
Although Latin America is known as the land of machismo, ten women have already served as president in different countries. The paintings of Frida Kahlo, the Mexican artist, go for the highest price of any female artist in all of the Americas. The seventeenth-century Mexican nun, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, was the hemisphere’s pioneer in the struggle for women’s rights and the mothers of the Plaza de Mayo were instrumental in the overthrow of the military dictatorship in Argentina in 1983. This class will explore femininity, masculinity, and gender relations south of the border, and deconstruct common stereotypes along the way. We will use a rich variety of readings (testimonials, literary works, and biographies), documentaries, and films in order to understand how people’s lives have changed over time. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate. 
 
LIN 617-001: SPECIAL TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS: LANGUAGE, GENDER, AND SEXUALITY
RUSTY BARRETT
TR 12:30-1:45
This course presents an overview of contemporary research on language, gender, and sexuality. Topics will include: gendered patterns of language variation and change, linguistic representations of sexual/gender differences, the linguistic construction of gendered/sexual identities, power in conversational interaction, language ideologies and social inequality, proposals for inclusive language, language use in LGBTQ+ communities, sociophonetic studies of gender and sexuality, the negotiation of sexual consent, linguistic perspectives on intersectionality, slut shaming, sexual harassment, language and the body, and the relationship between grammatical gender and social gender. Readings will draw on research across a broad range of cultural and linguistic contexts. The course will also introduce a variety of research methodologies including critical discourse analysis, conversation analysis, variationist approaches, sociophonetic analysis and experimentation, the ethnography of speaking, and semiotics. No prior background in linguistics required for graduate students. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate. 
 
PSY 778-001: LGBTQ PSYCHOLOGY- A LIFESPAN PERSPECTIVE
RACHEL FARR
T 9:30-12:00
This graduate course is intended as an overview of issues related to sexual orientation and gender identity across the life course from the standpoint of the social sciences, particularly developmental psychology. The course will highlight recent and historical dimensions of controversies about approaches to conceptualization of sexual and gender identity, origins and development of sexual orientation, and issues related to identity formation and disclosure in adolescence and early adulthood. The course then moves on to consider lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer / questioning (LGBTQ) concerns during adulthood, such as relationships within and outside of couples, employment and careers, LGBTQ parenthood, and LGBTQ aging. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.
 
SOC 735: SEMINAR IN INEQUALITIES: MASCULINITIES
EDWARD MORRIS
W 3:00-5:30
“Men are not born; they are made.” -George Sumner Weaver, 1855. This course provides an introduction to sociological research and theory on masculinity. While the majority of scholarship in gender has focused on women, in this course we will critically interrogate men and the constitution of masculinity. This tack is crucial to understanding gender inequality because men as a group benefit from the gender order, and enactments of masculinity tend to reproduce power and dominance. At the same time, we will consider how intersections with other dimensions of inequality such as class, race, place, and sexuality complicate masculinities and position men differently in relationship to gender dividends. The course is organized to examine: 1) masculinity in theoretical and historical context, 2) how masculine identities are learned and represented, 3) how manhood is socially enacted, and 4) the future of masculinity research and praxis. We will cover topics such as the theory of hegemonic masculinity and critiques; masculinity from an intersectional perspective; and enacting manhood in areas such as education, sport, popular culture, and criminal justice. Note: There should be no course prerequisites for this course; enrollment is open to anyone with graduate standing. This course counts toward requirements for the GWS graduate certificate and other degrees as appropriate.
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