News

4/25/2011

Scout Diagnostics, a company targeting early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, recently received matching funds of $435,600 to support developing a laboratory test to detect and confirm Alzheimer’s disease in its earliest stages. Scout was formed in 2006 by University of Kentucky chemistry professors and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging researchers Mark Lovell and Bert Lynn, along with CEO John Beran.

The funds were awarded through Kentucky's competitive SBIR-STTR Matching Funds program, through which the state matches federal SBIR-STTR awards received by Kentucky companies and those willing to relocate to Kentucky. The STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer) award to Scout

4/25/2011

A University of Kentucky Arts and Sciences class will culminate its study of effective leadership next week with a talk from a war hero on the battlefield and back at home.

Former Army Ranger and Infantry Officer Nate Self will present "Leadership in Crisis" at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Student Center Small Ballroom.

As an Army ranger captain in 2002, Self led a group of courageous soldiers to the top of Takur Ghar Mountain to rescue a missing-in-action Navy SEAL, fighting the highest-altitude battle ever fought by U.S. troops. Seven of the first 10 men to die in the War on Terror fell in this battle.

The effort was dubbed “Rescue on Roberts Ridge,” and had it not been for Self’s quick-thinking and leadership, many more would have been killed. Upon returning home, Self was widely recognized as a

4/25/2011

A University of Kentucky Arts and Sciences class will culminate its study of effective leadership next week with a talk from a war hero on the battlefield and back at home.

Former Army Ranger and Infantry Officer Nate Self will present "Leadership in Crisis" at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Student Center Small Ballroom.

As an Army ranger captain in 2002, Self led a group of courageous soldiers to the top of Takur Ghar Mountain to rescue a missing-in-action Navy SEAL, fighting the highest-altitude battle ever fought by U.S. troops. Seven of the first 10 men to die in the War on Terror fell in this battle.

The effort was dubbed “Rescue on Roberts Ridge,” and had it not been for Self’s quick-thinking and leadership, many more would have been killed. Upon returning home, Self was widely recognized as a

4/25/2011

 For many members of the scientific community, returning to Earth's most fundamental elements can occasionally yield the greatest findings.  There's nothing more predictable on Earth than sunrise and sunset. And there's nothing more basic than blue-green algae.

This year's Thomas Hunt Morgan Lecturer is an expert on blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria.

University of California at San Diego (UCSD) biology professor Susan S. Golden will speak on "Developing Cyanobacteria for Production of Industrial Products and Fuels" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.  On Thursday, April 28th, Golden will speak about "How Bacteria Tell Time" at 4 p.m. in room 116 of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Building.

Golden, a distinguished professor in the molecular biology

4/25/2011

 For many members of the scientific community, returning to Earth's most fundamental elements can occasionally yield the greatest findings.  There's nothing more predictable on Earth than sunrise and sunset. And there's nothing more basic than blue-green algae.

This year's Thomas Hunt Morgan Lecturer is an expert on blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria.

University of California at San Diego (UCSD) biology professor Susan S. Golden will speak on "Developing Cyanobacteria for Production of Industrial Products and Fuels" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.  On Thursday, April 28th, Golden will speak about "How Bacteria Tell Time" at 4 p.m. in room 116 of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Building.

Golden, a distinguished professor in the molecular biology

4/25/2011

In 1834, Scottish naval engineer John Scott Russell observed a boat being pulled rapidly along a thin channel by a pair of horses. When the boat suddenly stopped, Russell noticed that the bow wave continued forward and moved down the channel "apparently without change of form or diminution of speed," according to his writings.

Over 50 years later, Russell's observation led the Dutch mathematicians Diederik Johannes Korteweg and Gustav de Vries to formulate a nonlinear equation describing Russell's wave. Russell's solitary wave, or "soliton" and its relatives have found numerous applications in nonlinear optics, plasma physics and signal processing.

Mathematics professor Peter Perry will trace the trajectory of Russell's solitary wave through pure and applied mathematics from its discovery nearly two

4/25/2011

In 1834, Scottish naval engineer John Scott Russell observed a boat being pulled rapidly along a thin channel by a pair of horses. When the boat suddenly stopped, Russell noticed that the bow wave continued forward and moved down the channel "apparently without change of form or diminution of speed," according to his writings.

Over 50 years later, Russell's observation led the Dutch mathematicians Diederik Johannes Korteweg and Gustav de Vries to formulate a nonlinear equation describing Russell's wave. Russell's solitary wave, or "soliton" and its relatives have found numerous applications in nonlinear optics, plasma physics and signal processing.

Mathematics professor Peter Perry will trace the trajectory of Russell's solitary wave through pure and applied mathematics from its discovery nearly two

4/21/2011

University of Kentucky geologist and cave diver Stephanie Schwabe recalls her 1997 dive into the Mermaid's Lair, on the south side of Grand Bahama Island quite plainly.

Schwabe is not one to embellish or exaggerate. A simple account of her late August dive is captivating of its own accord.

Schwabe, a renowned cave diver of international acclaim, will share the story of her nearly fateful dive on National Geographic Explorer's Angel Effect at 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, on the National Geographic Channel.

Angel Effect delves deep inside the mysterious phenomenon of the "Third Man Factor

4/21/2011

University of Kentucky geologist and cave diver Stephanie Schwabe recalls her 1997 dive into the Mermaid's Lair, on the south side of Grand Bahama Island quite plainly.

Schwabe is not one to embellish or exaggerate. A simple account of her late August dive is captivating of its own accord.

Schwabe, a renowned cave diver of international acclaim, will share the story of her nearly fateful dive on National Geographic Explorer's Angel Effect at 10 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, on the National Geographic Channel.

Angel Effect delves deep inside the mysterious phenomenon of the "Third Man Factor," as detailed in John Geiger's

4/20/2011

University of Kentucky international studies and history major Richard Sellnow will head to China this summer as the sole recipient of the 2011 NSCS International Scholar Laureate Program Award (ISLP).

This $2,000 award was created by The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) to help members attend one of the ISLP's many programs during the summer of 2011.

“I am incredibly grateful to the NSCS for honoring me with this most appreciated award,” said Sellnow. “Participating in the International Scholar Laureate Program is an amazing opportunity which will be of myriad benefit to me, but it is also an opportunity which I would have had difficulty taking advantage of without the most generous

4/20/2011

University of Kentucky international studies and history major Richard Sellnow will head to China this summer as the sole recipient of the 2011 NSCS International Scholar Laureate Program Award (ISLP).

This $2,000 award was created by The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) to help members attend one of the ISLP's many programs during the summer of 2011.

“I am incredibly grateful to the NSCS for honoring me with this most appreciated award,” said Sellnow. “Participating in the International Scholar Laureate Program is an amazing opportunity which will be of myriad benefit to me, but it is also an opportunity which I would have had difficulty taking advantage of without the most generous assistance of NSCS in the form of this award.”

4/19/2011
Until recently, most physicists believed that the laws of nature allow only one kind of universe to exist — the universe as we know it. The hope was that as we learn more and more about the laws of physics at their most fundamental level, we come closer to a unique set of laws. To a large number of physicists, string theory offers the best hope of discovering these laws.

However, advancements in string theory over the past decade have led to an interesting twist to the discourse. Scientific developments seem to suggest that while the equations which govern the basic physical laws are unique, their solutions are not. Therefore it appears that there is a "cosmic landscape" of possible universes. And we happen to live in one of them – the one in which life itself is possible.

 

4/19/2011
Until recently, most physicists believed that the laws of nature allow only one kind of universe to exist — the universe as we know it. The hope was that as we learn more and more about the laws of physics at their most fundamental level, we come closer to a unique set of laws. To a large number of physicists, string theory offers the best hope of discovering these laws.

However, advancements in string theory over the past decade have led to an interesting twist to the discourse. Scientific developments seem to suggest that while the equations which govern the basic physical laws are unique, their solutions are not. Therefore it appears that there is a "cosmic landscape" of possible universes. And we happen to live in one of them – the one in which life itself is possible.

 

4/18/2011

A delegation of six Iraqi professors from the University of Kufa arrived on campus April 2. They are part of the Iraq University Linkages Program, which pairs Iraqi schools with U.S. institutions that can assist with curricular development.

In 2010, the University of Kentucky was one of five U.S. schools selected to receive a 3-year grant for curriculum development in Iraq. UK was paired with the University of Kufa, which is located in Najaf province in southern Iraq.

Other U.S. schools participating in this initiative are Ball State, the University of Cincinnati, Georgia State and Oklahoma State. Each school is partnered with an Iraqi university by the U.S. Department of State, based upon the specific needs of the Iraqi institution. The goals will be

4/18/2011

A delegation of six Iraqi professors from the University of Kufa arrived on campus April 2. They are part of the Iraq University Linkages Program, which pairs Iraqi schools with U.S. institutions that can assist with curricular development.

In 2010, the University of Kentucky was one of five U.S. schools selected to receive a 3-year grant for curriculum development in Iraq. UK was paired with the University of Kufa, which is located in Najaf province in southern Iraq.

Other U.S. schools participating in this initiative are Ball State, the University of Cincinnati, Georgia State and Oklahoma State. Each school is partnered with an Iraqi university by the U.S. Department of State, based upon the specific needs of the Iraqi institution. The goals will be

4/18/2011

Rachel Philbrick, a graduate student in classics at the University of Kentucky, has been awarded one of only 33 Jacob K. Javits Fellowships from the U.S. Department of Education. The Javits Fellowship is awarded to students of superior academic ability who plan to undertake graduate study in the selected fields of arts, humanities and social sciences.

As part of the Javits Fellowship, the U.S. Department of Education awards fellowships to students on the basis of demonstrated achievement, financial need and exceptional promise. The selection is made by a panel of experts appointed by the Javits Fellowship Board. The Javits Fellowship covers study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities and social

4/18/2011

Rachel Philbrick, a graduate student in classics at the University of Kentucky, has been awarded one of only 33 Jacob K. Javits Fellowships from the U.S. Department of Education. The Javits Fellowship is awarded to students of superior academic ability who plan to undertake graduate study in the selected fields of arts, humanities and social sciences.

As part of the Javits Fellowship, the U.S. Department of Education awards fellowships to students on the basis of demonstrated achievement, financial need and exceptional promise. The selection is made by a panel of experts appointed by the Javits Fellowship Board. The Javits Fellowship covers study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities and social

4/14/2011

Although Barbara Hogan was born into a white family and did not have to endure the harsh restrictions of segregation, she was struck by the glaring inequalities imposed by an apartheid government.

Refusing to remain a passive spectator, Hogan became a member of the outlawed African National Congress (ANC) in 1977, joining a chorus of voices speaking out against an oppressive apartheid regime. Ultimately, she not only became the first woman in South Africa to be found guilty of high treason for her “illegal” political activism, but she endured periods of harsh, solitary confinement during her imprisonment.

As a testament to her remarkable spirit, Hogan immediately began working toward the building of a democratic South Africa upon her release in 1990. A passionate supporter of equality, she has focused her energy on improving both the socio-economic conditions of all

4/14/2011
Title: UK Anthropologists Help Solve Problems Locally, Globally Contact: Cheyenne Hohman Page Content:

by Erin Holaday Ziegler

University of Kentucky anthropology professor Hsain Ilahiane first became attracted to the study of anthropology due to its prominent focus on people.
"You put yourself in the shoes of others in an attempt to comprehend," he explained. "This translation – it's meaningful."

Understanding and educating both sides of an issue frames the work of UK's entire Department of Anthropology, from Monica Udvardy's work on gender and symbolism in Africa and Diane King's advancement of honor killing awareness in the Middle East, to

4/14/2011
Title: Kristi Runyon Features South Africa & Kentucky Initiative on WTVQ-36 Contact: Cheyenne Hohman Page Content:
Kristi Runyon, a reporter on WTVQ-36, Lexington's ABC news affiliate, interviewed A&S Dean Mark Kornbluh about South Africa and Kentucky: Different Lands, Common Ground. The Dean spoke about the opening of the gallery at Lafferty Hall, which is currently hosting an exhibit about the life of Ahmed "Kathy" Kathrada. The exhibit will run until May 31.

To view the video, click here. Article Date: 4/14/2011

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