News

4/28/2011

 A University of Kentucky graduate student in the Department of Sociology with dreams of conducting field research on substance abuse treatment programs for women and children is well on her way, thanks to a highly competitive grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NIH National Research Training Award Program has awarded second year doctoral student Kathi Harp its prestigious Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for Individual Predoctoral Fellows.

Harp, who is interested in substance abuse treatment programs designed specifically for women with children, will focus on understanding how custody loss is related to substance use and criminal behaviors among African-American mothers.

"I am focusing on African-American women

4/28/2011

 A University of Kentucky graduate student in the Department of Sociology with dreams of conducting field research on substance abuse treatment programs for women and children is well on her way, thanks to a highly competitive grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The NIH National Research Training Award Program has awarded second year doctoral student Kathi Harp its prestigious Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award for Individual Predoctoral Fellows.

Harp, who is interested in substance abuse treatment programs designed specifically for women with children, will focus on understanding how custody loss is related to substance use and criminal behaviors among African-American mothers.

"I am focusing on African-American women

4/27/2011

Five University of Kentucky graduate students from the College of Communications and Information Studies' School of Library and Information Science (SLIS), recently participated in the Library of Congress Alternative Spring Break program in Washington, D.C. UK students Sara Wood, Jessicah Cheyenne Hohman, Meredith Nelson, Emily Pike and Emily Aldridge worked in different areas of the library.

Wood, from Lexington, said the program was set up to allow five graduate students from SLIS to participate in a week-long internship. The internship focused on the completion of a short project under the direction of a Library of Congress (LOC) librarian.

"Once we were selected based on our resumes and letters of interest, we were specifically matched to a project conducive to our experience and interests,"

4/27/2011

Five University of Kentucky graduate students from the College of Communications and Information Studies' School of Library and Information Science (SLIS), recently participated in the Library of Congress Alternative Spring Break program in Washington, D.C. UK students Sara Wood, Jessicah Cheyenne Hohman, Meredith Nelson, Emily Pike and Emily Aldridge worked in different areas of the library.

Wood, from Lexington, said the program was set up to allow five graduate students from SLIS to participate in a week-long internship. The internship focused on the completion of a short project under the direction of a Library of Congress (LOC) librarian.

"Once we were selected based on our resumes and letters of interest, we were specifically matched to a project conducive to our experience and interests,"

4/27/2011

Three University of Kentucky students have been selected to receive government-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. The fellowships will present the students with more than $100,000 to use toward research-based master's or doctoral degrees. Additionally, four other UK students received honorable recognition from the program.
 
The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in the U.S. and abroad. NSF fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $30

4/27/2011

Three University of Kentucky students have been selected to receive government-funded National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowships. The fellowships will present the students with more than $100,000 to use toward research-based master's or doctoral degrees. Additionally, four other UK students received honorable recognition from the program.
 
The NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program helps ensure the vitality of the human resource base of science and engineering in the United States and reinforces its diversity. The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in the U.S. and abroad. NSF fellows receive a three-year annual stipend of $30

4/27/2011

 As a current board member of a company she boycotted during apartheid, Zohra Ebrahim is a dynamic testament to the New South Africa.

Ebrahim draws on her past of political activism, as well as a wealth of experience on corporate boards, to assess the role of women in contemporary South Africa.

Women have gained a great deal in the new South Africa. It is the third most equitable government in the world. Forty-five percent of parliament ministers are women.

Unfortunately, women have not entered the ranks of business in the same way. There are only 12 women on corporate boards of listed companies and only one female CEO in the whole country. Violence against women and children occurs frequently as well, due in part to the legacy of families destroyed by apartheid policies.

"South Africa has come so far so fast," Ebrahim said, "But these changes bring

4/27/2011

 As a current board member of a company she boycotted during apartheid, Zohra Ebrahim is a dynamic testament to the New South Africa.

Ebrahim draws on her past of political activism, as well as a wealth of experience on corporate boards, to assess the role of women in contemporary South Africa.

Women have gained a great deal in the new South Africa. It is the third most equitable government in the world. Forty-five percent of parliament ministers are women.

Unfortunately, women have not entered the ranks of business in the same way. There are only 12 women on corporate boards of listed companies and only one female CEO in the whole country. Violence against women and children occurs frequently as well, due in part to the legacy of families destroyed by apartheid policies.

"South Africa has come so far so fast," Ebrahim said, "But these changes bring

4/26/2011
The 2010-2011 school year has been a record-breaking one for the Classics Division of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures. Four students have been recognized for their achievements:

Rachel Philbrick, earning her Master of Arts this year, has been awarded a Javits Fellowship and has decided to pursue her doctorate in Classics at Brown.  Elizabeth Barnes, also earning her Master of Arts this year, will be going to the University of Cincinnati for her doctorate, having been awarded a full fellowship.  Jonathan Meyers, a current Teaching Assistant, has earned an A&S Distinguished Teaching Award, which will be bestowed on Friday, April 29.  Claire Heitzman, Classics major and Gaines Fellow, has been awarded a 2011 CAMWS Manson Stewart Scholarship. Every year the Classical Association of the Middle West & South (CAMWS
4/26/2011
The 2010-2011 school year has been a record-breaking one for the Classics Division of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures. Four students have been recognized for their achievements:

Rachel Philbrick, earning her Master of Arts this year, has been awarded a Javits Fellowship and has decided to pursue her doctorate in Classics at Brown.  Elizabeth Barnes, also earning her Master of Arts this year, will be going to the University of Cincinnati for her doctorate, having been awarded a full fellowship.  Jonathan Meyers, a current Teaching Assistant, has earned an A&S Distinguished Teaching Award, which will be bestowed on Friday, April 29.  Claire Heitzman, Classics major and Gaines Fellow, has been awarded a 2011 CAMWS Manson Stewart Scholarship. Every year the Classical Association of the Middle West & South (CAMWS
4/25/2011

Scout Diagnostics, a company targeting early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, recently received matching funds of $435,600 to support developing a laboratory test to detect and confirm Alzheimer’s disease in its earliest stages. Scout was formed in 2006 by University of Kentucky chemistry professors and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging researchers Mark Lovell and Bert Lynn, along with CEO John Beran.

The funds were awarded through Kentucky's competitive SBIR-STTR Matching Funds program, through which the state matches federal SBIR-STTR awards received by Kentucky companies and those willing to relocate to Kentucky. The STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer) award to Scout

4/25/2011

Scout Diagnostics, a company targeting early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, recently received matching funds of $435,600 to support developing a laboratory test to detect and confirm Alzheimer’s disease in its earliest stages. Scout was formed in 2006 by University of Kentucky chemistry professors and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging researchers Mark Lovell and Bert Lynn, along with CEO John Beran.

The funds were awarded through Kentucky's competitive SBIR-STTR Matching Funds program, through which the state matches federal SBIR-STTR awards received by Kentucky companies and those willing to relocate to Kentucky. The STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer) award to Scout

4/25/2011

A University of Kentucky Arts and Sciences class will culminate its study of effective leadership next week with a talk from a war hero on the battlefield and back at home.

Former Army Ranger and Infantry Officer Nate Self will present "Leadership in Crisis" at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Student Center Small Ballroom.

As an Army ranger captain in 2002, Self led a group of courageous soldiers to the top of Takur Ghar Mountain to rescue a missing-in-action Navy SEAL, fighting the highest-altitude battle ever fought by U.S. troops. Seven of the first 10 men to die in the War on Terror fell in this battle.

The effort was dubbed “Rescue on Roberts Ridge,” and had it not been for Self’s quick-thinking and leadership, many more would have been killed. Upon returning home, Self was widely recognized as a

4/25/2011

A University of Kentucky Arts and Sciences class will culminate its study of effective leadership next week with a talk from a war hero on the battlefield and back at home.

Former Army Ranger and Infantry Officer Nate Self will present "Leadership in Crisis" at 11 a.m. Tuesday, April 26, in the Student Center Small Ballroom.

As an Army ranger captain in 2002, Self led a group of courageous soldiers to the top of Takur Ghar Mountain to rescue a missing-in-action Navy SEAL, fighting the highest-altitude battle ever fought by U.S. troops. Seven of the first 10 men to die in the War on Terror fell in this battle.

The effort was dubbed “Rescue on Roberts Ridge,” and had it not been for Self’s quick-thinking and leadership, many more would have been killed. Upon returning home, Self was widely recognized as a

4/25/2011

 For many members of the scientific community, returning to Earth's most fundamental elements can occasionally yield the greatest findings.  There's nothing more predictable on Earth than sunrise and sunset. And there's nothing more basic than blue-green algae.

This year's Thomas Hunt Morgan Lecturer is an expert on blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria.

University of California at San Diego (UCSD) biology professor Susan S. Golden will speak on "Developing Cyanobacteria for Production of Industrial Products and Fuels" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.  On Thursday, April 28th, Golden will speak about "How Bacteria Tell Time" at 4 p.m. in room 116 of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Building.

Golden, a distinguished professor in the molecular biology

4/25/2011

 For many members of the scientific community, returning to Earth's most fundamental elements can occasionally yield the greatest findings.  There's nothing more predictable on Earth than sunrise and sunset. And there's nothing more basic than blue-green algae.

This year's Thomas Hunt Morgan Lecturer is an expert on blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria.

University of California at San Diego (UCSD) biology professor Susan S. Golden will speak on "Developing Cyanobacteria for Production of Industrial Products and Fuels" at 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.  On Thursday, April 28th, Golden will speak about "How Bacteria Tell Time" at 4 p.m. in room 116 of the Thomas Hunt Morgan Building.

Golden, a distinguished professor in the molecular biology

4/25/2011

In 1834, Scottish naval engineer John Scott Russell observed a boat being pulled rapidly along a thin channel by a pair of horses. When the boat suddenly stopped, Russell noticed that the bow wave continued forward and moved down the channel "apparently without change of form or diminution of speed," according to his writings.

Over 50 years later, Russell's observation led the Dutch mathematicians Diederik Johannes Korteweg and Gustav de Vries to formulate a nonlinear equation describing Russell's wave. Russell's solitary wave, or "soliton" and its relatives have found numerous applications in nonlinear optics, plasma physics and signal processing.

Mathematics professor Peter Perry will trace the trajectory of Russell's solitary wave through pure and applied mathematics from its discovery nearly two

4/25/2011

In 1834, Scottish naval engineer John Scott Russell observed a boat being pulled rapidly along a thin channel by a pair of horses. When the boat suddenly stopped, Russell noticed that the bow wave continued forward and moved down the channel "apparently without change of form or diminution of speed," according to his writings.

Over 50 years later, Russell's observation led the Dutch mathematicians Diederik Johannes Korteweg and Gustav de Vries to formulate a nonlinear equation describing Russell's wave. Russell's solitary wave, or "soliton" and its relatives have found numerous applications in nonlinear optics, plasma physics and signal processing.

Mathematics professor Peter Perry will trace the trajectory of Russell's solitary wave through pure and applied mathematics from its discovery nearly two

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